This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
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aka14kgold:

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.
The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:
“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”
And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:
“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”
Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:
“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”
But Officer Thomas did have one request:
“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”
And guess what? The story gets even better.
After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.
And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.
She started crying when he told her:
“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”
And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.
Source


I N S T I N C T

It’s not really about instinct though. PLENTY of cops who shoot unarmed Black children are indeed acting on instinct—instinctual hatred. 
No, this officer was acting on EMPATHY. This officer took the time and energy to think about the human being in front of her and react humanely. This officer was not acting on impulse—which is necessary when acting solely on instinct—but acting with rational assessment to the problem she was faced with. Empathy may be instinctual for her; but it has to be practiced that way, and what she really deserved praise for is the original step of extending thought and consideration to other people.

Empathy and logic too. Arresting this woman was only going to have the net effect of increasing misery in the world. The government would have spent thousands to process her, house her (if she can’t afford bail, which is likely) and her children. She gets a record and has an even harder time finding work with the possibility of losing her kids to a system that can’t take care of them. Both this family and society in general is worse off. This police officer made a wise as well as an empathetic decision.

aka14kgold:

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.

The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:

“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”

And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:

“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”

Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:

“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”

But Officer Thomas did have one request:

“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”

And guess what? The story gets even better.

After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.

And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.

She started crying when he told her:

“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”

And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

Source

I N S T I N C T

It’s not really about instinct though. PLENTY of cops who shoot unarmed Black children are indeed acting on instinct—instinctual hatred. 

No, this officer was acting on EMPATHY. This officer took the time and energy to think about the human being in front of her and react humanely. This officer was not acting on impulse—which is necessary when acting solely on instinct—but acting with rational assessment to the problem she was faced with. Empathy may be instinctual for her; but it has to be practiced that way, and what she really deserved praise for is the original step of extending thought and consideration to other people.

Empathy and logic too. Arresting this woman was only going to have the net effect of increasing misery in the world. The government would have spent thousands to process her, house her (if she can’t afford bail, which is likely) and her children. She gets a record and has an even harder time finding work with the possibility of losing her kids to a system that can’t take care of them. Both this family and society in general is worse off. This police officer made a wise as well as an empathetic decision.

(via kyssthis16)

ourtimeorg:

It’s time to raise the minimum wage too http://wefb.it/RDFkx4

ourtimeorg:

It’s time to raise the minimum wage too http://wefb.it/RDFkx4

The poor man who takes property by force is called a thief, but the creditor who can by legislation make a debtor pay a dollar twice as large as he borrowed is lauded as the friend of a sound currency. The man who wants the people to destroy the Government is an anarchist, but the man who wants the Government to destroy the people is a patriot.

William Jennings Bryan,  Principal Speech Against Unconditional Repeal (16 August 1893).

Still relevant.

"…Rich people don’t riot because they have other forms of influence. Riots are a class act.”

Nobody in their right mind wants more violent protests. But nobody wants more Michael Browns either. And those two things – the violence of the state and the violence of the street – are connected. “A riot,” said Martin Luther King, “is the language of the unheard.” The people on the streets don’t donate thousands of dollars to anyone’s campaign. They don’t get a seat at any table where decisions are made or have the ear of the powerful. But with four black men killed by the police in the country in the last four weeks, they have a lot to say, and precious few avenues through which to say it. The question now is who’s listening.
But that’s the crux of white supremacist racial logic: the problem with black people is … well, black people – not mass incarceration and the deindustrialization of urban America, not educational inequality and generational poverty, not 400 years of slavery, lynchings, and Jim Crow. To be black in America is to be victimized and then made responsible for our victimization. We built this country. But, apparently, it is we who are lazy and dependent. We are bullied politically, socially and economically. But it is we who are called “thugs”.

“There is never an excuse for violence against police,” President Obama said. Yet there are endless excuses for state violence against black people. For mass incarceration, there’s the “war on drugs”. For poverty and unemployment, there’s “a culture of laziness” and “government dependence”. For the educational gap, there’s the burden of “acting white”. For Eric Garner: “loosies”. And for Michael Brown, there are stolen cigarillos, jaywalking or anything the police can say to shift the narrative from their white supremacist practices to black “ghetto” culture.

It is to say that black lives do not matter, that our babies deserve death and despair, that our communities don’t deserve protection and justice.

Terrible Florida Mom Arrested For Leaving Kids At Park While Getting Them Food →

Let’s make sure we have the law straight: If you’re a poor mother, you can be arrested for child neglect if you leave your kids alone while you go to a food bank so you can feed them, go to a job interview (so you can feed them), or work (so you can feed them).

These arrests are part of the terrible trap we’ve set for impoverished parents:

In the mid-1990s, President Clinton signed welfare reform legislation into law that changed welfare in America profoundly. One of the major changes welfare reform brought about was the work requirement. Now, even women with young children were required to be working, or looking for work, in order to receive benefits. In a radio address after signing the bill, Clinton promised that if poor people went to work, “we will protect the guarantees of health care, nutrition, and child care, all of which are critical to helping families move from welfare to work.”

We broke that promise. State and federal childcare spending last year fell to the lowest level since 2002. Much of the money available for childcare comes to states through Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, or today’s version of welfare, but TANF hasn’t been adjusted for inflation since 1996. It’s lost a third of its value since then. The money spent on childcare has declined from a high of $4 billion in 2000 to $2.6 billion in 2013. That means fewer and fewer children get subsidized care. The number of children served by subsidies is at the lowest level since 1998. In [Shanesha] Taylor’s home state of Arizona, childcare spending has been axed by 40 percent, dropping 33,000 kids. In [Debra] Harrell’s, it was cut by more than 30 percent, dropping 2,500 children.

We’ve also taken the rug out from under any mothers who might need assistance because they can’t find work or the work doesn’t pay enough. In 1996, welfare reached 72 percent of poor families with children. That had dropped to a mere 26 percent by 2012.

So when a homeless mother needs to go to a job interview or a mother making less than $8 an hour needs to go to work, what options have we given them? Few, if any.

The big lie about capitalism is that everyone can be rich. That’s impossible. Capitalism works only if the vast majority of the population are kept poor enough to never quit working, are kept poor enough to accept distasteful jobs society cannot function without. If everyone were a millionaire, who would empty the trash or repair the sewers? It follows that the poorer the general population is made, the greater the worth of the money held by the wealthy, in terms of the lives which may be bought and sold with it.
…[W]e need to stop talking about the economy in ways that make it seem like the weather. The economy is a result of the rules we create and the choices we make. The people who are struggling to make ends meet do so because we have built — through intentional choice — an economy that produces inadequate incomes for more than one-third of all Americans…

Deepak Bhargava, Executive Director for the Center for Community Change

Paul Ryan: “My plan will end poverty by forcing the poor to sign contracts saying they will get off food stamps and start a hedge fund.”

Story:

The Worst Part Of Paul Ryan’s Poverty Plan Is Based On A Media Myth

(via teapartycat)

The “discussion draft” submitted by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) to the House Budget Committee on potential solutions to poverty in America includes the proposal that low-income Americans would have to sign “contracts” in order to remain eligible for social safety net benefits, such as food stamps, or SNAP. The contract would include: benchmarks, such as finding a job, enrolling in employment training, or even meeting “new acquaintances outside circle of poverty”; a “timeline” in which individuals are contractually-obligated to meet those benchmarks; bonuses for meeting benchmarks early; and “sanctions for breaking the terms of the contract”:

I’m sure giving the impoverished even more paperwork to deal with will help them not be poor anymore. As with almost all libertarians, Paul Ryan is secretly a major fan of big government—as long as it’s used to crush people other than him.

It’s funny that Ryan is so hellbent on ‘reforming’ entitlements like Social Security. It seemed to work fine for him. You all remember that he paid for college using Social Security survivor benefits, right?

(via mediamattersforamerica)

girljanitor:

huffingtonpost:

Homeless shelter is transformed into 5-star restaurant, hot food and warm hearts all around.  See the full video here. 

I watched the video and I thought it was great. Because it’s not just like, nice food or whatever, it’s being treated like a guest. The people who staged this also made a 5k donation as well as handing out fancy gift bags that had basic self-care items/toiletries which are in really high demand because people will donate food but never think about hairbrushes, soap, toothpaste, et cet.

Not only that but i really appreciate the sentiment here that’s so against that whole poverty policing, “poor people don’t deserve anything nice ever” bullshit that’s getting louder in our society.

(via bedbugsbiting)

throughthewildblue:

You cannot buy electronics with food stamps. You cannot buy cigarettes with food stamps. You cannot buy pet food with food stamps. You cannot withdraw money with an EBT card (food stamps).

Do you know what else you can’t buy with food stamps? Shampoo, soap, laundry detergent, toilet paper, paper towels, tissues, tinfoil, plastic sandwich bags, toothpaste, cleaning products, tampons, pads, over the counter medications (such as Tylenol, Ibuprofen, etc.), and anything else you can think of that you cannot physically ingest for nutritional purposes.

Do you know what you can buy with food stamps? Food.

Do you know what it’s like to scrounge for change to buy non-edible necessities, use a credit card and EBT card (food stamps) during the same transaction, and then have the person in line behind you judge you for buying the ingredients to make a birthday cake?

People who disseminate false information about food stamps have never had to use food stamps.

Shameless liars and hatemongers.

(Source: sandandglass, via cognitivedissonance)

…The Congressman was trying to pester [Tianna Gaines-Turner] on the whole “government dependence” bore…In response to the pestering, she says that she isn’t “dependent on the program,” but [is] in fact “independent on the program.” This is an impressively clever retort that deserves to be popularized.

Matt Bruenig on the brilliant ways Gaines-Turner, a woman who testfieid about her experiences with poverty at a congressional hearing, responded to Republican assholery. Democratic leadership could learn a thing or two from her!

To be fair though, outsmarting a congressional Republican is probably easy compared to the rigors of dealing with poverty on a daily basis.

azspot:

When We Say The Right Doesn’t Care About the Poor, This is What We Mean

Steadfast conservative = Teabagger, Christian theocrat
Business conservative = plutocrat
Young “outsiders” = libertarians, more accurately described as young Republicans

azspot:

When We Say The Right Doesn’t Care About the Poor, This is What We Mean

Steadfast conservative = Teabagger, Christian theocrat

Business conservative = plutocrat

Young “outsiders” = libertarians, more accurately described as young Republicans

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Anya Groner: The Heart You Save Won’t Be Your Own →

This is really good. Read it when you get a chance.