1. image: Download

    sinidentidades:

Coffins on the border wall to commemorate those who lost their lives in the desert trying to cross the border. 

According to the New York Times:

While…illegal immigration numbers are down overall, migrants are dying in the desert at the same rate that they have been for years (roughly between 150 and 250 deaths a year), according to statistics compiled by the Arizona Recovered Human Remains Project and the human rights group No More Deaths. In the past 10 years alone, some 2,000 migrants — men, women, children and the elderly — have died this way.
Why does this number remain so disturbingly high? Because of the “funnel effect” created by the militarization of the United States-Mexico border: hundreds of miles of physical barriers, high-tech infrastructure, highway checkpoints and other security enhancements have combined to reroute migrants away from highly trafficked and relatively safe urban crossing zones and into remote and perilous stretches of scorching, waterless desert. Fewer migrants may be crossing, but those that do face more treacherous journeys.

    sinidentidades:

    Coffins on the border wall to commemorate those who lost their lives in the desert trying to cross the border. 

    According to the New York Times:

    While…illegal immigration numbers are down overall, migrants are dying in the desert at the same rate that they have been for years (roughly between 150 and 250 deaths a year), according to statistics compiled by the Arizona Recovered Human Remains Project and the human rights group No More Deaths. In the past 10 years alone, some 2,000 migrants — men, women, children and the elderly — have died this way.

    Why does this number remain so disturbingly high? Because of the “funnel effect” created by the militarization of the United States-Mexico border: hundreds of miles of physical barriers, high-tech infrastructure, highway checkpoints and other security enhancements have combined to reroute migrants away from highly trafficked and relatively safe urban crossing zones and into remote and perilous stretches of scorching, waterless desert. Fewer migrants may be crossing, but those that do face more treacherous journeys.

     
  2. Asian Americans Respond to Pew: We’re Not Your Model Minority

    post-colonial:

    Note: I am not getting involved into Tumblr clusterfucks about ‘Asian privilege’ but this is worth reading for Asians and non-Asians alike who doubt that the model minority MYTH is proof that Asians are Most Favored

    It’s not every day that deep and rigorous research about Asian Americans is released to the public. So when the well-respected Pew Research Center released “The Rise of Asian Americans,” a comprehensive report on the community on Tuesday, it should have been reason enough to celebrate. Instead, the report, which hailed Asians as the fastest-growing and highest-achieving racial group in the country, drew widespread criticism from Asian American scholars, advocates and lawmakers who raised alarm about the report, and warned against taking it seriously at all. Poor research of an oft-overlooked community, it turns out, might do more damage than no research at all.

    We are “deeply concerned about how findings from a recent study by the Pew Research Center have been used to portray Asian Americans,” the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, a network of civil rights advocacy groups said on Wednesday. The report’s authors, the AACAJ said, “paint a picture of Asian Americans as a model minority, having the highest income and educational attainment among racial groups. These portrayals are overly simplistic.”

    The Pew report included both census data and social trend polling of the six largest Asian-American ethnicities—Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese. These communities make up 85 percent of the roughly 17 million Asian Americans. According to Pew, half of Asians in the U.S. graduated from college, compared with just 30 percent for the general population, and report a median annual household income of $66,000* when Americans as a whole make $49,000…

    Critics say the Pew report mixes some fact with too much mythology about what people imagine Asians to be. While a portrayal of Asian Americans as high-achieving, and adept at overcoming humble beginnings to reach great financial and educational success seems flattering, many Asian Americans say this frame is not only factually inaccurate, it’s damaging to the community.

    *One of the reasons the median ‘Asian’ income is higher than most racial groups is because there are very few Asian Americans compared to most other groups (they make up less than 3% of the population) and the vast majority live in extremely expensive cities. This doesn’t necessarily mean that they are richer, it means that the cost of living in these cities is higher but for specific reasons, Asians have patterns of settling there (think LA, Cali, Texas is cheap but living in Houston is not always cheap, etc). Again this is a statistical slight that doesn’t show you the whole picture.

    Read More

    Glossing over the class and educational disparities (among other things) among Asian Americans not only reinforces racist perceptions of Asians as interchangeable (“all the same”), but serves to reinforce the white supremacist race hierarchy:

    The narrative fits in neatly with a very American “bootstraps” ethos, where people rise and fall on their own skills and merits. It’s a convenient narrative for silencing other groups who try to make claims of institutional racism and racial discrimination. “There’s this aspect of the media coverage where races are being played against each other,” said Yeung. “The not so implicit message is Asians are the better people of color whereas blacks and Latinos are seen as having all these kinds of problems, so why can’t all people of color be like us.”

     
  3. Who’s white?

    For whatever reason, many white Americans seem to think that ‘white’ = WASP (white Anglo Saxon Protestant) and that folks whose forebears came over on the Mayflower are the actual whites, not the Italians, Russian Jews, Irish Catholics, etc. It’s certainly true that non-Anglo European ethnic groups were once considered nonwhite. But the definition of whiteness changed generations ago to encompass pretty much any European ethnicity that embraced white supremacy. So nonwhites from Europe got to become white ethnic Americans and enjoy white privilege. And nonwhites from every other continent remained nonwhite…because what’s the point of being white if there are no nonwhite people around to oppress?

    Yet I’ve had many conversations with white Americans who’ve tried to employ that throwback definition of whiteness, to treat ‘white’ as though it only means ‘WASP’. Conveniently, this distancing from whiteness tends to only occur during conversations about racism. I don’t think they realize that whiteness is achieved, but that non-whiteness is thrust upon you. Their European ancestors gladly handed in their nonwhite badges as soon as they were able to do so. This was an opportunity that many others at the time did not have (though some tried) because their ethnicity was visible in their skin color, hair texture, eye shape, etc.

    What’s particularly annoying is when white Americans not only deny their whiteness, but attempt to use their immigrant ancestry to appropriate ‘person of color’ as an identity. ‘People of color’ was devised as a positive, empowering alternative to terms like ‘minorities’ and ‘nonwhites’, which can be inaccurate or suggest otherness and inferiority. The term subverts the usual racial dynamic by suggesting that white people lack color instead of us lacking whiteness. ‘People of color’ is a specifically racial term. It does not mean ‘ethnic people’ or ‘non-WASPs’.

    It is also a modern term that began gaining prominence by being employed by racial justice advocates in the 1960s and ’70s. It is nonsensical and self-serving to use an archaic definition of non-whiteness in order to claim a label that modern nonwhites popularized.

    So the fact that your ethnicity wasn’t considered white generations ago doesn’t mean you can get away with claiming to be nonwhite or a person of color today. You still benefit from white privilege. And claiming POC status so on the basis of your Euro ethnic identity is particularly offensive since your ancestors chose to leave non-whiteness behind by stepping on black people, Mexicans, Chinese, Indians, and other nonwhites on their way up the racial hierarchy.

    Some further reading:

     
  4. What’s behind the creepy conservative obsession with the birthrate

    Ross Douthat wrote a predictable, pageview-grabby piece about America’s declining birthrate. It’s not entirely terrible, but he chose to end with an eyebrow-raising point:

    Beneath these policy debates, though, lie cultural forces that no legislator can really hope to change. The retreat from child rearing is, at some level, a symptom of late-modern exhaustion — a decadence that first arose in the West but now haunts rich societies around the globe. It’s a spirit that privileges the present over the future, chooses stagnation over innovation, prefers what already exists over what might be. It embraces the comforts and pleasures of modernity, while shrugging off the basic sacrifices that built our civilization in the first place.

    Such decadence need not be permanent, but neither can it be undone by political willpower alone. It can only be reversed by the slow accumulation of individual choices, which is how all social and cultural recoveries are ultimately made.

    Well that bit of nuttiness pretty much undermines all of the more sensible things he says earlier in the column. I’m lazy, so here’s a roundup of responses to Douthat that cover all the points that I was going to make anyway:

    Echidne-of-the-Snakes highlights the implicit sexism of Douthat’s editorial, as well as its short-sighted nationalism:

    Douthat’s piece wonders what might happen if the drop in fertility becomes permanent.  He even hesitantly suggests public sector support for families with children but not the kind of support which has been shown to raise birth rates:  Paid parental leaves and subsidized daycare.  Those were probably omitted because they allow women to work in the labor force AND have more children.  But anything which does NOT support women’s ability to remain in the work force will not affect the reduced fertility rates.

    Whether high birth rates are desirable, from a global point of view, is a different question. Douthat limits his viewpoint to competition between countries, failing to ask how many people this earth can support if, as is most likely, all of them wish to have a style of living which is currently available for only the wealthier parts of the world.

    Jamelle Bouie for The American Prospect points out that there’s nothing ‘decadent’ or wrong about people wanting to enjoy lives freed from the burdens of childrearing, especially given how difficult it is to balance work with raising a family. Douthat’s column seems to be insidiously blaming women, who are still the primary caretakers of children in most households, for not choosing motherhood in greater numbers:

    The simple fact is that it’s only been in the last century that a substantial number of ordinary people have been been able to build decent lives free of severe hardship. If men andwomen are choosing to “embrace the comforts and pleasures of modernity,” it’s because they are far preferable to the pains and troubles of an earlier time, where happiness was a luxury for ordinary people.

    Which isn’t to say that things are perfect now, or even good. But they are substantially better than in the past. That is especially true for women, who seem to be the chief target of Douthat’s disdain.

    I think Douthat has accurately described the attitude of modern people in the world’s richest societies. The fact of the matter, however, is that this is only “decadence” to those who—by dint of class and identity—can harbor fantasies of an earlier, harder time, secure in the knowledge that they would never have to suffer.

    Lawyers, Guns, and Money notes the nativism in Douthat’s concern over the declining U.S. birthrate:

    …while there’s generally a hefty amount of dishonesty in Douthat’s columns, one claim from today’s stands out: “with fertility in decline across Mexico and Latin America, it isn’t clear that the United States can continue to rely heavily on immigrant birthrates to help drive population growth.”

    The US currently admits a tiny fraction of those who apply for legal resident status, and the number who apply is almost certainly depressed by the extraordinarily long odds of success, especially for those without a plausible asylum claim or family reunification angle. We could change immigration policy to admit substantially more immigrants than we now do…

    Of course, a steady or slightly growing population generated by high immigration rather than birth rates will lead to a more racially and culturally diverse polity. This would be a welcome development for a host of reasons, one of which would be that it would hasten the coming of the moment in which the Republican party is forced to choose between being a nationally competitive party or a party heavily invested in nativist white identity politics.

    Matthew Yglesias points out that social conservatives need to shift their views on economic policy if they’re serious about promoting families:

    Josh Barro wrote a shrewd column the other day arguing that conservatives need to get over their gut-level hostility to “redistribition” in order to find an intellectually respectable way of making their agenda relevant to middle-class concerns. The sensible parts of Douthat’s column offer perhaps another way of looking at this. In much of the aughts, the GOP seemed to be pushing an unpopular, elite-focused economic agenda and getting away with it by yoking it to a popular social conservative agenda. But with public opinion rapidly shifting on gay equality and the demographic composition of the electorate shifting, that particular combo doesn’t work as well as it used to. The way back could involve shifting economic policy for social conservative reasons exactly as the extensive welfare states in Sweden and France are designed, in part, to specifically promote the interests of people with kids.

    So whenever you see someone freaking out about the declining native birthrate in first world countries like the U.S. or Japan or Europe, question why that’s such a bad thing. In nearly all cases, the hand-wringing over fertility is really a concern over increasing immigration and greater reproductive freedom and economic opportunities for women.

    Finally, if conservatives really are serious about wanting more young workers to help support an increasingly aging population, then they have to 1) institute a more liberal, flexible immigration policy and/or 2) figure out how to provide incentives for people who want to start families. Not just child tax credits, but things that allow people (especially women) to be workers and parents at the same time, like affordable daycare, universal preschool education, flexible work hours/career paths, etc. Blaming ‘decadent’ individual choices as if they’re divorced from the economic and social realities of having children is just conservative nonsense.

     
  5. "I’m not a racist or xenophobe and I’m not asking anyone to give up their cultre or heritage, but fucking learn English"

    dammitcaleb:

    This statement came across my tumblr dashboard today w/o any further explanation, information, etc. I haven’t received a response to my simple question of “Why?”. This post isn’t a direct response to the OP, so much as my thoughts around this sentiment, as I’ve heard it plenty of times in many situations in my life, and I’ll consider some basic assumptions based on what I know about the OP, namely that he is a white man living in San Diego, California which has a considerable resident population of people born outside of the US—from Mexico, largely. 

    First, I can’t imagine a situation in which it is not xenophobic to make a generalised statement to an un-named group of people in which one demands that this group of people should learn your language.

    This is not to say that life in general would not be simpler if everyone involved had a common language. That goes without saying, but statements like this imply that the subject of your statement hasn’t already considered that this is probably a good idea. I guarantee you, someone who is in a situation in which a lot of people speak a language that they don’t speak has considered how much easier it would be if they all spoke the same language. Telling people that they should learn your language is patronising, narcissistic, and rude.

    Learning a foreign language is not easy for many people. If you’re one of those for whom this comes naturally, consider yourself lucky and learn one. For the others, learning a new language becomes more difficult as one approaches adulthood. English is considered to be one of the harder languages for non-native speakers to learn, owing to its many “exceptions to the rule” when it comes to spelling and pronunciation. These are, themselves, the result of the English Language’s history of absorbing words from literally all over the world (following the path of colonisation, naturally). 

    Also, when people say this, there’s an underlying assumption (sometimes outrightly stated) that people who are in the US and who don’t speak English are somehow being inconsiderate or disrespectful or that they’ve at some point made a decision to not learn English. My first-thought reaction to this is always: It’s not all about you! Again, English isn’t easy to learn. People who don’t speak English are in the US for lots of reasons. People who migrate to the US without fluency in English do so for many more reasons, and not a single one of them is so they can be a nuisance to Ugly Americans. These people generally understand (in my admittedly limited, though representative, experience) that their assimilation into and success in US society would be simpler with fluency in the common language. Many of the people you encounter who have immigrated to the US from Mexico and who don’t speak English are likely poor people who might be working more than one low-wage job in the US. Even someone who has only one low-wage job might not have the resources (ie, money for classes) to learn a foreign language. 

    Immigrants historically settle in communities with people of similar background, reducing the need to learn a foreign language. This is true throughout history, around the world, and is not likely to change any time soon.

    People who say things like this (and other, sometimes more blatantly racist statements) often say, “But my friend/spouse/sibling-in-law is [insert type of Brown Person] and agrees/doesn’t get mad/thinks this is OK to say!”.

    I believe you. I do. 

    I believe you without a doubt, without qualification, and without even needing to confirm that this person you described exists and, in fact, doesn’t mind when you say these incredibly dehumanizing things. I believe this because People of Color (POC) are all individuals and all have different ways of managing the racism that is directed at us consistently and constantly when we live in the US. Many of us start to agree with parts of it, or tell ourselves it’s “not that bad”, or “that’s just how things are”, etc. This doesn’t make it The Right Thing To Do. Also, don’t use your friend/spouse/sibling-in-law as a human shield. Fight your own goddamned fight & try to understand this on your own.

    “But English is the Official Language of America.”

    No, it’s not.

    English is the Common Tongue, really. Besides the fact that the US just doesn’t have an Official Language, nothing would really change if it did. When a country has an Official Language, this generally means that matters of Law & Business are conducted in that language. In the US, these are already conducted in English, & it’s already required that those petitioning for US citizenship should demonstrate fluency in English so… what is there to gain from declaring an Official Language, really? You can’t really penalise people for speaking another language—what would that do for tourism and foreign relations?

    In closing: It’s not all about you. Quit being a jerk. If it bothers you that much, then take some Spanish classes. I say that knowing more languages means you can talk to more people. The French say, “La personne qui parle deux langues en vaut deux!”

    This makes me so angry. My parents came to the U.S. when they were well into adulthood and learning a second language was a slow and painful process. They are still not fluent, though their comprehension is pretty good. They don’t primarily speak in their native language to piss off racists, but because it’s easier for them. Why should they have to make things more difficult for themselves in order to make an American bigot feel more comfortable?

    Also, the are-you-making-fun-of-us? issue that sometimes seems to be at the heart of these English-only campaigns:

    We don’t spend all our time talking about you. Your nail techs, gardeners, servers, taxi drivers, dry cleaners, etc. are probably talking about things that are far more interesting than your Anglo ass. Quit being so paranoid.

    But there might be occasions when we are talking shit about you. We have to deal with your racism. I think you can deal with being made fun of in a language you can’t understand anyway.

     
  6. Some highlights from a recently published report about domestic workers:

    • 94% of domestic workers are women.
    • 23 percent of workers are paid below the state minimum wage.*
    • Undocumented domestic workers are paid about 20% less than those who are U.S. citizens.
    • 66% of all those surveyed reported working while sick, injured or in pain. 56% of U.S.-born domestic workers and 77% of undocumented domestic workers reported working under such conditions.
    • Workers of color make up 54% of the domestic workforce.
    • The median wage for white caregivers is $12/hour; that of black and Latino caregivers is $10/hour; and $8.33 for Asian caregivers. (The exception is black nannies, who make an average $12.71/hour as opposed to $12.51 for white nannies.)
     
  7. One of my favorite things about American racism is that the nation’s commitment to white supremacy has both encouraged imperialist wars of conquest and then horrifying the racial sensitivities of Americans to their results. In 1846, the U.S. went to war with Mexico for no justifiable reason (unless you think expanding the nation’s slave empire is a good reason) and stole the northern half of that country. Much to James Polk’s surprise, the Mexicans did not want to give up their northern frontier. Polk finally ordered the military to take Mexico City since the Mexicans wouldn’t surrender. Under General Winfield Scott, the army engaged in a brutal, blood-soaked five month campaign that finally managed to capture Mexico City in September 1847, a very important moment in Mexican public memory.

    After Scott took Mexico City, some of the biggest supporters of American expansion noted that since they already controlled the capital, why not just annex the entire nation? One big problem though. What to do with all the brown people? They aren’t black so we can’t enslave them all. Plus there’s so many of them. But they certainly aren’t white so they obviously can’t be allowed into the nation as equals.

    […]

    The anti-imperialist movement was full of white supremacists in the late 1890s, arguing that bringing the world’s darker peoples into the United States threatened American institutions. They didn’t win that fight. But after the U.S. conquest of the Philippines, employers in California saw a new source of cheap labor. With everyday people of California committed to keeping their state white, they protested against both Chinese and Japanese immigration, getting the former excluded in 1882 and the latter heavily restricted in 1907. Such a thing wasn’t possible for the Filipinos since they were now Americans. Filipinos came over by the thousands to work on the farms and in the fish canneries. Even worse, Filipino men began marrying white women, using the courts to get around California’s miscegenation laws. This caused huge outrage in California. The upshot of it all was the Tydings-McDuffie Act of 1934, which gave the Philippines independence in 1946 in exchange for the immediate end to almost all Filipino immigration.

    In the end, many Americans decided that colonial expansion was not worth the price of brown men having sex with white women.

     
  8. In a security message, the embassy said the State Department’s travel section had been “updated to inform U.S. citizens of a rise in unprovoked harassment and violent attacks against persons who, because of their complexion, are perceived to be foreign migrants. U.S. citizens most at risk are those of African, Asian, Hispanic, or Middle Eastern descent in Athens and other major cities.”

    The travel advice on Greece also said the embassy “has confirmed reports of U.S. African-American citizens detained by police authorities conducting sweeps for illegal immigrants in Athens.”

    — 

    US Embassy warns Americans of possible racist attacks in Greece | The Clarion-Ledger | clarionledger.com (via redlightpolitics)

    “citizens most at risk are those of African, Asian, Hispanic, or Middle Eastern descent”

    Well that nicely covers about 80% of humanity. You might as well just come clean and say “safe for whites only”, it’s a more direct statement.

    (via zuky)

    This is why POC don’t trust white people. As soon as things get bad for you guys, you come looking for a nonwhite person to fuck up.

    (via downlo)

    y’all don’t understand the situation in greece at all. they’re not looking for POC to fuck up because stuff got bad; this is the kind of behavior that happens all the time anyway. and yet greeks seem to think we’re somehow “not racist” because there usually aren’t any non-whites in greece anyway.

    this is one of the most embarrassing things about my country. 

    (via neonspandex-revival)

    No one said that that racism and xenophobia didn’t exist in Greece before the economic problems. But the recent economic troubles have led to a noticeable increase in attacks on POC and immigrants in Greece, as well as a jump in popularity for Golden Dawn, a fascist, xenophobic political party that seems to be modeled after the Nazis.

    Something similar has been happening all over Europe. Far-right, neo-fascist, xenophobic parties gained popularity in other European countries due to anxieties about the the EU and the rising rate of nonwhite immigration. That’s not to say these far-right parties are the mainstream, but they have undeniably gained ground since the 1990s.

    So I don’t see how my original comment misunderstands the situation. When white Europeans get scared about how things are going, they reflexively blame brown ‘outsiders’ for their problems. The more stressed out white people get, the more xenophobic and racist they become. This has happened in the past and is happening now and will happen again. (And in case people think I’m beating up on Greece or Europe too much, it happens in the U.S. too. When the economy goes south, people suddenly become a lot more concerned about immigration, especially immigration from the south.)

     
  9. Victory for abused Filipino caregiver

    sigawla:

    ABUSED FILIPINO CAREGIVER SETTLES WITH EMPLOYER FOR $100,000

    By Henni Espinosa, ABS-CBN North America Bureau

    Nov. 9, 2012

    SAN JOSE, Calif. – Nelly Gonzales, 58, still gets emotional when she talks about her ordeal as a caregiver in the U.S.

    For 15 years, Gonzales was abused by her Filipino employer, paying her as low as $150 a month, to care for six developmentally-delayed adults 24/7.

    She said, “All I wanted was respect. No matter your stature in life, you deserve some respect.”

    It took her 15 long, agonizing years but Gonzales finally found the courage to fight back, after she saw Filipino caregiver Victoria Aquino on Balitang America talk about filing a case against her abusive employer.

    She pointed out, “If she could do it, I thought, I could do it too. I could fight for my rights.”

    Through the help of the Pilipino Association of Workers and Immigrants or PAWIS, Gonzales filed a claim for back wages against her employer in 2010.

    Click here to read full article 

    If you are an abused caregiver and want to know how you can fight for your rights, call PAWIS at (408) 657-8947.

    Domestic workers in Southern California can also reach the Filipino Migrant Center at (310) 421-8362 or info@filipinomigrantcenter.org. Click here for the FMC website

     
  10. explore-blog:

Another brilliant New Yorker cover by Christoph Niemann, for the Thanksgiving issue. Niemann’s Abstract City is a must-have.

I like this cover. It’s a reminder that 1) this holiday essentially celebrates the fact that a bunch of European invaders didn’t die like so many others had. It’s a harvest festival, but it’s also implicitly a celebration of imperialism. 2) ‘Illegal immigration’ is something that didn’t really exist in the U.S. until the passage of racist laws explicitly preventing certain ethnic groups from entering the country and/or naturalizing.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

    explore-blog:

    Another brilliant New Yorker cover by Christoph Niemann, for the Thanksgiving issue. Niemann’s Abstract City is a must-have.

    I like this cover. It’s a reminder that 1) this holiday essentially celebrates the fact that a bunch of European invaders didn’t die like so many others had. It’s a harvest festival, but it’s also implicitly a celebration of imperialism. 2) ‘Illegal immigration’ is something that didn’t really exist in the U.S. until the passage of racist laws explicitly preventing certain ethnic groups from entering the country and/or naturalizing.

    HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

     
  11. The Republican Party continues to be stubbornly terrible when it comes to women’s issues. Plus, their opposition to renewing VAWA with added protections for undocumented immigrants, Native Americans, and lesbian, trans, bisexual and queer women demonstrates that their misogyny is intersectional:

    House GOP leaders aren’t yielding to a bipartisan coalition of Senate leaders demanding they extend the protections of the Violence Against Women Act — an anti-domestic abuse bill that was first passed with broad support in 1994 but hit a brick wall of Republican opposition earlier this year.

    “Nothing has changed,” a senior GOP aide told TPM. “The House has passed a bill, we are ready to move to conference, and the Speaker has announced his conferees. We are waiting on Senate Democrats to follow suit and act.”

    Six months ago, Senate Democrats passed re-authorization that expanded the law’s protections to LGBT women, illegal immigrants and Native Americans. House Republicans rejected that approach, and in response passed a scaled back version that would make it more difficult for domestic violence victims in the country illegally to achieve legal status.

    […]

    Failing to extend funding would reduce available resources for state and local governments to combat domestic violence. As things stand, the stalemate shows no signs of ending.

     
  12. An exchange about immigration reform between Carlos Gutierrez, who served as Commerce Secretary under George W. Bush, and notoriously anti-immigrant troglodyte, Gary Bauer. The GOP is doomed to remain the party of angry old white guys as long as people like Bauer continue to have influence.

     
  13. Lightening up on immigration won’t be enough. Like it or not, conservatives are going to need a much more thorough housecleaning if they want to survive in an increasingly diverse future. No more gratuitous ethnic mockery. No more pretense that reverse racism is the real racism. No more suggestions that minorities just want a handout. No more screeching about the incipient threat of Sharia law. No more saturation coverage of the pathetic New Black Panthers. No more complaining that blacks get to use the N word but whites don’t. No more summers of hate on Fox News. No more tolerance for Dinesh D’Souza and his “roots of Obama’s rage” schtick; or for Glenn Beck saying Obama has a “deep-seated hatred of white people”; or for Rush Limbaugh claiming that “Obama’s entire economic program is reparations.” No more jeering at the mere concept of “diversity.” And no more too-clever-by-half attempts to say all this stuff without really saying it, and then pretending to be shocked when you’re called on it. Pretending might make you feel virtuous, but it doesn’t fool anyone and it won’t win you any new supporters.



    That’s just a start. One way or another, the Republican Party simply has to stamp this out. And not just because they need to do it to survive, but because it’s the right thing to do. That still counts, doesn’t it?

     
  14. A new report, “Raising the Floor for American Workers: The Economic Benefits of Comprehensive Immigration Reform,” by Dr. Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, finds that comprehensive immigration reform that includes a legalization program for unauthorized immigrants and enables a future flow of legal workers would result in a large economic benefit—a cumulative $1.5 trillion in added U.S. gross domestic product over 10 years. In stark contrast, a deportation- only policy would result in a loss of $2.6 trillion in GDP over 10 years.

     
  15. huffingtonpost:

    The LA City Council voted 12-1 Wednesday to make a controversial Universal City Services Card available to the city’s over 400,000 undocumented immigrants, as well as to transgender individuals, foster youth, homeless and individuals without access to financial services, CBS reports.

    Cardholders will have the option of using the card as a debit card, which will reduce their risk of theft by obliterating the need to carry large sums of cash. Councilman Richard Alarcon, who introduced the proposal, said there are currently tens of thousands of cash-only immigrants who are “literally walking ATMs for thugs,” ABC reports.

    The debit service would also help put a stop to payday lenders, which gouge undocumented immigrants with exorbitant fees.