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Proletarian Beauty Tip: Combine two shitty things to make a less shitty thing

Do you have a half-full pot of gel/cream eyeliner that’s all dried up and useless but you can’t bear to throw away because you spent, like, 15 bucks on it? Do you have a primer that you don’t use anymore because it gave you zits but you refuse to bin it in the hopes that maybe someday it magically won’t break you out?

Comrades, just add a squirt of the primer to the eyeliner. Use a toothpick or whatever to mix it up. Ta da—Your eyeliner will be creamy and useable again!

As far as I can tell, doing this does not affect the performance or color of the eyeliner. I revived my MAC Fluidline last night with some Bare Escentuals Prime Time and wore that shit to work today. It was like, 98 degrees outside and the AC in my car is broken. My liner looked great, even though the rest of me looked like hell.

OR just throw your crusty, old eyeliner and primer away you decadent bourgeois swine, you.

Brought to you by:

image

(Actually, I read this tip in a review on makeupalley.com. And this image is what turned up when I google image searched “communist cosmetics”. Maybe this says something about my web-browsing habits, but this is not the first time I’ve seen this.)

fastcompany:

Tiny “microbeads” in beauty products seemed great, until someone tried to clean them up.
Sometimes product innovation turns out beautifully. Other times, it gets messy and requires a clean up. The story of plastic microbeads in personal care products—the tiny spheres in many body washes and toothpastes that Illinois became the first state to ban last week—is an example of the latter.

Read More>

Argh. People were warning us about plastic microbeads years ago and nobody listened. Here’s a pdf with an updated list of products that contain microbeads. And here’s an app.
And here are some product alternatives from Allure and PopSugar Beauty

fastcompany:

Tiny “microbeads” in beauty products seemed great, until someone tried to clean them up.

Sometimes product innovation turns out beautifully. Other times, it gets messy and requires a clean up. The story of plastic microbeads in personal care products—the tiny spheres in many body washes and toothpastes that Illinois became the first state to ban last week—is an example of the latter.

image

Read More>

Argh. People were warning us about plastic microbeads years ago and nobody listened. Here’s a pdf with an updated list of products that contain microbeads. And here’s an app.

And here are some product alternatives from Allure and PopSugar Beauty

(via ipsadixit)

http://quichelotta.tumblr.com/post/90511735064/if-any-of-you-have-parents-grandparents-or-know →

quichelotta:

If any of you have parents, grandparents, or know anyone else over the age of 65* who lives in New York State and has Medicare, please ask them if they’re aware of EPIC, which is a state program that helps pay for drug costs and can save someone SO much money if they’re taking lots of…

The Difference Between Baking Soda and Baking Powder →

A clear explanation for novice bakers like me

Why English Eggs Are Way Different From American Ones →

Ah, this explains why English (and European) grocery stores don’t refrigerate eggs. (They also don’t refrigerate milk).

New research by Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer demonstrates that students who write out their notes on paper actually learn more. Across three experiments, Mueller and Oppenheimer had students take notes in a classroom setting and then tested students on their memory for factual detail, their conceptual understanding of the material, and their ability to synthesize and generalize the information. Half of the students were instructed to take notes with a laptop, and the other half were instructed to write the notes out by hand. As in other studies, students who used laptops took more notes. In each study, however, those who wrote out their notes by hand had a stronger conceptual understanding and were more successful in applying and integrating the material than those who used took notes with their laptops.

What drives this paradoxical finding? Mueller and Oppenheimer postulate that taking notes by hand requires different types of cognitive processing than taking notes on a laptop, and these different processes have consequences for learning. Writing by hand is slower and more cumbersome than typing, and students cannot possibly write down every word in a lecture. Instead, they listen, digest, and summarize so that they can succinctly capture the essence of the information. Thus, taking notes by hand forces the brain to engage in some heavy “mental lifting,” and these efforts foster comprehension and retention. By contrast, when typing students can easily produce a written record of the lecture without processing its meaning, as faster typing speeds allow students to transcribe a lecture word for word without devoting much thought to the content.

Study finds writing by hand helps learning. It also boosts creativity. (via explore-blog)

I’ve found this to be true for me, at least. With a laptop, I end up basically transcribing what a lecturer (or whoever) is saying.

Other advantages to a pen and paper: I don’t have to worry about dropping my paper notebook and breaking it; I don’t have to sit near an electrical outlet; they’re cheap.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Are BuzzFeed quizzes hoarding your personal data? →

Answer: Yes, especially if you reached the quiz through Facebook.

theonion:

Shocking Report Says Even The Smallest Horse Bite Can Be Harmful To Newborn Babies (Image Source: ‘The New England Journal of Medicine’)

theonion:

Shocking Report Says Even The Smallest Horse Bite Can Be Harmful To Newborn Babies 

(Image Source: ‘The New England Journal of Medicine’)

americastestkitchen:

Beware of Changing Cake Mix Sizes: The big three cake-mix manufacturers have a secret. Without telling anyone, Pillsbury, Duncan Hines, and Betty Crocker have downsized their cake mixes by two or three ounces. And as blogger Judy Walker warns, this few-ounce discrepancy can make a world of difference in the finished baked good. Consider this just another reason to make your own cakes.

(via ornamentedembellished)

liquorinthefront:

am-photo:

Hey folks!
So it’s the most terrible time of year again, which means those pesky bell ringers are out in full force collecting donations for the Salvation Army.
You probably all know this already, but the Salvation Army is an Evangelical church, not a charity — and they have a pretty nasty history of discriminating against the queer community. 
I could post a myriad of links to articles that support this, but if you do a simple google search for “salvation army lgbt” you’ll have several hours of repugnant material to read through.
The organization has recently responded to anti-queer allegations stating “We firmly oppose the vilification and mistreatment of gays and lesbians. Any such incident is in clear opposition to all established Salvation Army policy.”
But just 4 months earlier, one of their officers — Major Andrew Craibe — was on Australian air telling  journalists Serena Ryan and Pete Dillon that non-celibate queer people should be put to death. If you’d like to listen to that, it’s here: http://soundcloud.com/johnmbecker/salvation-army-major-lgbt  (comments regarding death begin at 6:15)
I keep coming across mention of these ‘downloadable vouchers’ to drop into their kettles as a protest, but they’re all fairly low quality (and don’t look particularly nice to begin with). I’ve made my own voucher to drop into kettles here in Toronto, but I want to share it with you folks as well. It’s a pretty small file, high resolution, print ready with crop marks.  
Or if you prefer a smaller .pdf file, that’s here: http://www.mediafire.com/view/?7e1wrzdfkmw7859
Use it if you like, or reblog this post to spread the word. Print + protest. 
xo

good stuff to know people

A good timeline of the Salvation Army’s bigotry

liquorinthefront:

am-photo:

Hey folks!

So it’s the most terrible time of year again, which means those pesky bell ringers are out in full force collecting donations for the Salvation Army.

You probably all know this already, but the Salvation Army is an Evangelical church, not a charity — and they have a pretty nasty history of discriminating against the queer community. 

I could post a myriad of links to articles that support this, but if you do a simple google search for “salvation army lgbt” you’ll have several hours of repugnant material to read through.

The organization has recently responded to anti-queer allegations stating “We firmly oppose the vilification and mistreatment of gays and lesbians. Any such incident is in clear opposition to all established Salvation Army policy.”

But just 4 months earlier, one of their officers — Major Andrew Craibe — was on Australian air telling  journalists Serena Ryan and Pete Dillon that non-celibate queer people should be put to death. If you’d like to listen to that, it’s here: http://soundcloud.com/johnmbecker/salvation-army-major-lgbt  (comments regarding death begin at 6:15)

I keep coming across mention of these ‘downloadable vouchers’ to drop into their kettles as a protest, but they’re all fairly low quality (and don’t look particularly nice to begin with). I’ve made my own voucher to drop into kettles here in Toronto, but I want to share it with you folks as well. It’s a pretty small file, high resolution, print ready with crop marks.  

Or if you prefer a smaller .pdf file, that’s here: http://www.mediafire.com/view/?7e1wrzdfkmw7859

Use it if you like, or reblog this post to spread the word. Print + protest. 

xo

good stuff to know people

A good timeline of the Salvation Army’s bigotry

(via wretchedoftheearth)