1. Not only did a Latino actor not play Tony, who clearly in real life looks like a Chicano, but his ethnicity is stolen from the Latino community at a time when Latinos have been demonized. Our real Latino national heroes if acknowledged would dramatize our patriotism and contribution to the United States…

    In “Argo” we have yet another instance where the public has been denied of an opportunity for all Americans to learn of an American Latino’s valor, talent and patriotism. This occurs because there has been no consequence to this behavior. It is time for a change.

    — 

    Moctesuma Esparza on Ben Affleck’s Argo and the White-Washing of the Mexican-American.  Esparza says:

    The film actually goes out of its way to obscure Tony Mendez’ ethnicity. His name (Mendez) is mentioned only once and the character says he is from New York (Tony was born in Nevada from a mining family with six generations in Nevada and raised in Colorado). Nowhere in the movie does the viewer get that the hero is Mexican American. 

    Ben Affleck’s portrayal of Antonio “Tony” Mendez was very contained and had very little range, I don’t know what Tony personality is like to judge the portrayal but this did not impact the movie’s success or failure. It was an excellent role that would have elevated a Latino actor like Benjamin Bratt or Michael Peña.

     Instead, like with the story of Guy Gabaldon, whose extraordinary achievements in the WWII Battle of Saipan,  capturing, by himself, 1800 enemy soldiers, more than any other  American soldier in the history of our country, was similarly white-washed as Jeffrey Hunter played him in the 1960 film, “Hell to Eternity.”  But that was more than half a century ago, Argo is now

    In the closing credits, the photos of the real people portrayed are presented side-b- side with the actors’ photos showing the very close resemblance and care that was taken in the casting process to cast actors who looked like the real people. Yet, for the key role of Tony Mendez, the director/producer Ben Affleck chose a single long shot of Tony with President Carter where his image was not distinct or recognizable, breaking the pattern he had chosen for all the other real people depicted. 

    (via racebending)

    White privilege is being able to star in a person of color’s life story. See also: Angelina Jolie in A Mighty Heart and almost everyone in 21. Nevemind. I should have made a separate post. Sorry, folks.

     
  2. I don’t need a ‘What If’ movie scenario for black heroes because history shows they actually existed. Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, MLK—Where the frack are their movies? Do you know Danny Glover has been trying for almost two decades to get a Touissant L’Oeuverture movie made? And every major studio has shut the door in his face. And let’s not talk about how a Nat Turner movie has been unanimously blackballed in Hollyweird. So a studio will give money to a fictionalized spaghetti western, revenge slavery movie but not support our real heroes. Think on that. Then go get your life!
    — 

    ReBecca Theodore-Vachon, Thinking Critically Because You Refuse To (via sonofbaldwin)

    nat turner, for folks who dont understand why his story is so scary.

    (via deluxvivens)

     
  3. One of the ancient ploys of the film industry is to make a film about non-white people and find a way, however convoluted, to tell it from the point of view of a white character.
    — 

    Film critic Roger Ebert on Hollywood in his review of “Flowers of War”

    “Can you think of any reason the character John Miller is needed to tell his story? Was any consideration given to the possibility of a Chinese priest? Would that be asking for too much?”

    (via racebending)
     
  4. jhameia:

    Because Merry and Pipping comparing dick sizes will never get old.

    Some of the best behind-the-scenes material ever.

     
  5. 18:29 10th Dec 2012

    Notes: 4286

    Reblogged from darkjez

    Tags: quvenzhané wallisfilmgifgifs

    afrogeekgoddess:

    The New York Times Magazine Hollywood Issue
    Heroines - Quvenzhané Wallis (x)

    The film is adorable.

     
  6. I love historical films and I’m so sick of all these kinds of Jane Austen movies where they have these fucking period movies. How many times do we have to remake fucking Pride and Prejudice? How many times do white people need their history told to them over and over and over again? It’s so fucking boring. It’s always the same. There are enough movies like that. There are enough examinations of white people history. There’s enough of all these novels, all the Bronte sisters, all the fucking Jane Austen bullshit — I don’t care anymore. I’m sick of it. Why can’t we go into other people’s history? Why can’t we go into more Asian history? Why can’t we go into more Asian-American history? Why can’t we go into more Latin-American history? Why can’t we do any of these things? But they don’t. We have to keep regurgitating Old England. It’s so racist, and nobody actually comes out and says this is fucking stupid.
     
  7.  
  8. 





As urban myth would have it, you’re a man of habits. Around this time, you’re supposed to have haunted Bob’s Big Boy Restaurant every day. Is that true?Yeah. I was into Bob’s halfway through Eraserhead. Each day at 2:30 p.m. I’d have several cups of coffee and one chocolate shake - a silver goblet shake. I discovered that sugar makes me happy and inspires me, so I would get onto a sugar jag and create on the napkins. Try to get ideas, I got so wound up that I had to rush home and write. I’m heavily into sugar. I call it ‘granulated happiness.’ It’s just a great help. You know, a friend.
How long did your love affair with Bob’s last?Eight, nine years. The end of Dune was pretty much the end of Bob’s.

    As urban myth would have it, you’re a man of habits. Around this time, you’re supposed to have haunted Bob’s Big Boy Restaurant every day. Is that true?
    Yeah. I was into Bob’s halfway through Eraserhead. Each day at 2:30 p.m. I’d have several cups of coffee and one chocolate shake - a silver goblet shake. I discovered that sugar makes me happy and inspires me, so I would get onto a sugar jag and create on the napkins. Try to get ideas, I got so wound up that I had to rush home and write. I’m heavily into sugar. I call it ‘granulated happiness.’ It’s just a great help. You know, a friend.

    How long did your love affair with Bob’s last?
    Eight, nine years. The end of Dune was pretty much the end of Bob’s.

     
  9. image: Download

    Bret Easton Ellis would be considered a mildly interesting writer if he were a woman, but since he’s a white man, he’s really overrated.

    Bret Easton Ellis would be considered a mildly interesting writer if he were a woman, but since he’s a white man, he’s really overrated.

     
  10. In Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft’s first encounter in the hotel room, Bancroft did not know that Hoffman was going to grab her breast. Hoffman decided offscreen to do it, because it reminded him of schoolboys trying to nonchalantly grab girls’ breasts in the hall by pretending to put their jackets on. When Hoffman did it onscreen, director Mike Nichols began laughing loudly offscreen. Hoffman began to laugh as well, so rather than stop the scene, he turned away from the camera and walked to the wall. Hoffman banged his head on the wall, trying to stop laughing, and Nichols thought it was so funny, he left it in.

    Well that’s super fucking creepy and disgusting.

    (Source: lesliehowards)

     
  11. searchingforknowledge:

    blackamazon:

    laughingfish:

    saucefactory:

    liminalzone:

    wait. the entire internet is fired for not informing me of this earlier.

    YER ALL FIRED DAMN YOU

    EXCUSE ME.

    I DONT GET NEAR ENOUGH ALAN RICKMAN SNOGGING IN MY ENTERTAINMENT LIFE

    where is this from???????

    This is from a 1998 movie called Dark Harbor. There’s a clip of it here. BTW, Norman Reedus looks like a completely different dude when he’s spiffed up.

    (Source: butterflysfics)

     
  12. troubledsigh asked: re: that Oldboy casting call, when it was first released a bunch of people tweeted Spike Lee about it and he said it was inaccurate, but I haven't heard any updates since then. (He then, afterward, made some jokes about people "not knowing Spike Lee" if they believed that, to which it's like, yeah Spike, even you could be taken over by white supremacy...

    Who knows? IMBD has a cast list and it still looks very white. The two leading roles are white. As far as I can tell, there’s one Asian person in a remake of an Asian movie. So yeah, I’m still not into this. An “American remake” of a foreign movie filled with nonwhites always means jamming it full of white people. Because American = white.

    I dunno—I’m just irritated by the very notion of Americans remaking foreign movies. It’s part of a larger trend of studios unwilling to back ideas unless they are already successful (so, reboots and sequels galore). And the way remakes are handled tends to reinforce the white supremacist idea that people are unwilling to watch movies that don’t star white people. I also just wish Americans would be more willing to get out of their comfort zones, culturally and linguistically, and just watch more foreign movies.

     
  13. 00:20 1st Dec 2012

    Notes: 7566

    Reblogged from sleepandbooks

    Tags: moviesfilmmisandry

    image: Download

    sleepandbooks:

strangeasanjles:

#1 on my Misandry Films playlist.

Oh my god this movie

What other movies would you all add to the Misandry Films playlist?
I think I’d add: Teeth and Sympathy for Lady Vengeance.

    sleepandbooks:

    strangeasanjles:

    #1 on my Misandry Films playlist.

    Oh my god this movie

    What other movies would you all add to the Misandry Films playlist?

    I think I’d add: Teeth and Sympathy for Lady Vengeance.

    (Source: lena-ganshina)

     
  14. image: Download

    motherjones:

Statistics on ways in which women and girls are stereotyped, sexualized, and underrepresented in movies and television—even on children’s TV shows.

    motherjones:

    Statistics on ways in which women and girls are stereotyped, sexualized, and underrepresented in movies and television—even on children’s TV shows.

     
  15. fyeahblackhistory:

    Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask explores for the first time on film one of the pre-eminent theorist of the anti-colonial movements of this century. Fanon’s two major works, Black Skin, White Masks and The Wretched of the Earth, were pioneering studies of the psychological impact of racism on both colonized and colonizer. Jean-Paul Sartre recognized Fanon as the figure “through whose voice the Third World finds and speaks for itself.” This innovative film biography restores Fanon to his rightful place at the center of contemporary discussions around post-colonial identity.

    Born in Martinique in 1925, Fanon received a conventional colonial education. When he went to France to fight in the Resistance and train as a psychiatrist, his assimilationist illusions were shattered by the gaze of metropolitan racism. Out of this experience came his first book Black Skin, White Masks (1952) originally titled “An Essay for the Disalienation of Blacks.” Fanon here defined the colonial relationship as the psychological non-recognition of the subjectivity of the colonized.

    Soon after taking a position at a psychiatric hospital in Algeria, Fanon became involved in the bitter Algerian civil war, eventually leaving his post to become a full-time militant in the Algerian National Liberation Front (FLN). Out of this struggle, Fanon wrote his most influential book, The Wretched of the Earth, which Stuart Hall describes as the “bible of the decolonization movement.”

    Fanon died of leukemia in 1961, just as Algeria was winning its independence. But his seminal texts continue to challenge us to liberate ourselves from all forms of psychological domination.