This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
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One of the devastating weaknesses of university learning, of the store of knowledge and opinion that has been handed down through academic training, has been its almost total erasure of women’s experience and thought from the curriculum… What you can learn [in college] is how men have perceived and organized their experience, their history, their ideas of social relationships, good and evil, sickness and health, etc. When you read or hear about “great issues,” “major texts,” “the mainstream of Western thought,” you are hearing about what men, above all white men, in their male subjectivity, have decided is important.

— Adrienne Rich, “Claiming an Education" (pdf), a commencement speech given at Douglass College, 1977

(Source: kawrage, via socio-logic)

In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester.
workingamerica:

Good question. http://bit.ly/1jFytQ8
(Graphic via Being Liberal) http://ift.tt/1q9Hsw3

A: Conservatives who send their kids to private school (some of which were founded to avoid integration btw)

workingamerica:

Good question. http://bit.ly/1jFytQ8

(Graphic via Being Liberal) http://ift.tt/1q9Hsw3

A: Conservatives who send their kids to private school (some of which were founded to avoid integration btw)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

New research by Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer demonstrates that students who write out their notes on paper actually learn more. Across three experiments, Mueller and Oppenheimer had students take notes in a classroom setting and then tested students on their memory for factual detail, their conceptual understanding of the material, and their ability to synthesize and generalize the information. Half of the students were instructed to take notes with a laptop, and the other half were instructed to write the notes out by hand. As in other studies, students who used laptops took more notes. In each study, however, those who wrote out their notes by hand had a stronger conceptual understanding and were more successful in applying and integrating the material than those who used took notes with their laptops.

What drives this paradoxical finding? Mueller and Oppenheimer postulate that taking notes by hand requires different types of cognitive processing than taking notes on a laptop, and these different processes have consequences for learning. Writing by hand is slower and more cumbersome than typing, and students cannot possibly write down every word in a lecture. Instead, they listen, digest, and summarize so that they can succinctly capture the essence of the information. Thus, taking notes by hand forces the brain to engage in some heavy “mental lifting,” and these efforts foster comprehension and retention. By contrast, when typing students can easily produce a written record of the lecture without processing its meaning, as faster typing speeds allow students to transcribe a lecture word for word without devoting much thought to the content.

Study finds writing by hand helps learning. It also boosts creativity. (via explore-blog)

I’ve found this to be true for me, at least. With a laptop, I end up basically transcribing what a lecturer (or whoever) is saying.

Other advantages to a pen and paper: I don’t have to worry about dropping my paper notebook and breaking it; I don’t have to sit near an electrical outlet; they’re cheap.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Jindal's selective concern for the poor →

Jindal and his allies want the public to see them as entirely sincere. They’re not trying to crush teachers’ unions, and they’re not on a privatization crusade, intent on destroying public institutions. They just want to help low-income children, even spending public funds to advance their goal.

But their purported concern for the poor is literally unbelievable. When the issue is health care and housing, Jindal and other conservatives say struggling families should rely on the free market and their capacity to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. When the issue is education, suddenly the right cares deeply about disadvantaged children and is eager to “help.”

When Jindal and other school voucher advocates are ready to assist “poor and disadvantaged” families in ways that don’t undermine public schools and teachers’ unions, I’ll gladly revisit the debate. Until then, this looks a lot like a scam.

If this is the wave of the future, it makes nonsense of just about all the conventional wisdom on reducing inequality. Better education won’t do much to reduce inequality if the big rewards simply go to those with the most assets. Creating an “opportunity society”, or whatever it is the likes of Paul Ryan etc. are selling this week, won’t do much if the most important asset you can have in life is, well, lots of assets inherited from your parents. And so on.

Paul Krugman (via azspot)

People are going into debt for the majority of their lives in order to get the college degree that’s necessary for many jobs, yet that BA has become less and less valuable over time. Why should people invest so much in their training if it’s not going to pay off?

(via azspot)

wnycradiolab:

proofmathisbeautiful:

staceythinx:

Chemistry crayon labels from the QueInteresante Etsy store.

About the project: 

Children play and draw with crayons practically every day, so why not make the experience more educational? This listing is for a set of 48 labels to stick in the crayons in a basic 48 pack of crayons so that while children are coloring, they are also exposed to the names of chemicals that will make those colors! So instead of thinking “I want green” they will think “I want Barium Nitrate Ba(NO3)2 Flame” and then when they take chemistry in high school and their teacher sets some gas on fire and it makes a green color and they ask the class what chemical it was your student will know it was Barium! Genius!

WANT!!

OK, yeah, this is pretty cool.

For many men it is unthinkable that women could possess a technical competence equal to their own. Women would have to be paragons of competence to be accepted by male colleagues (Cockburn, 1985, 188)

Finn, Geraldine. Voices of Women, Voices of Feminism: Limited Edition. Fernwood Publishing; Halifax. 1993. (pg. 113)

Relevant: a recent study that found women face persistent gender bias in the sciences:

Science professors at American universities widely regard female undergraduates as less competent than male students with the same accomplishments and skills, a new study by researchers at Yale concluded.

I’d wager that you’d find similar results if you conducted the same experiment in other fields.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via wretchedoftheearth)

I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else.

— Toni Morrison  (via feministquotes)

(Source: oprah.com, via panic0)

First, is this actually a boy?
Second, speaking as someone who has graded exams, this is just smug Tumblr nonsense. I doubt the grader didn’t notice the second paragraph—they just viewed it as extraneous. Just like I don’t grade outlines students make in their blue books to plan out their answers (unless they don’t offer anything else).
Students of Tumblr, listen up: you’re not graded on every mark you make on the page, but whether you answer the question and how good the answer is. This student did offer a pretty decent answer. And there were other parts to the test, which we aren’t seeing.
Humorless teacher killjoy, signing out.

First, is this actually a boy?

Second, speaking as someone who has graded exams, this is just smug Tumblr nonsense. I doubt the grader didn’t notice the second paragraph—they just viewed it as extraneous. Just like I don’t grade outlines students make in their blue books to plan out their answers (unless they don’t offer anything else).

Students of Tumblr, listen up: you’re not graded on every mark you make on the page, but whether you answer the question and how good the answer is. This student did offer a pretty decent answer. And there were other parts to the test, which we aren’t seeing.

Humorless teacher killjoy, signing out.

(Source: pleatedjeans, via karnythia)

vivvacious:

spasticalactica:

palisplace93:

Israeli Soldiers stop Palestinian school-girls from going to school, Al Khalil-Hebron. You don’t want us to go to school, fine we’ll have school here. 

Still winning ladies

And this is the meaning of strength and courage.

To give a little more context, I believe these photos are from last year. The IDF had tightened security and was making everyone who wanted to enter the area where the school is located undergo physical searches, which included going through metal detectors and x-ray machines. There were no longer any exceptions for pregnant women or people with health problems. So teachers started holding lessons at the checkpoint in protest. According to this timeline, settlers threw bottles and rocks at them and the IDF eventually fired tear gas at them when they refused to disperse. Life under occupation.

(Source: almoqawama, via uhuh-she-said-deactivated201312)

As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians.

According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.

Ten myths about affirmative action (via linzyxxxxx)

This is EXTREMELY blatant on college campuses. The fact that these things need to be clarified is sad.

(via newwavefeminism)

Legacy is the real affirmative action…and yet we don’t see certain types of entitled people suing to dismantle that.

(via invisiblelad)

YUP I went to a school with so many kids like that. One dude had the nerve to go on and ON about affirmative action and how it was unfair and yet he was a legacy and his brother got into MIT because his father put in a call. Did he see any problem? Of course not.

(via sunny1)

(Source: sociolab, via sunny1)

eBook tumblrs!

ziriam:

Also:

http://fckvrso.wordpress.com/

These collections are filled mostly with leftist theory, sociology, history, philosophy, political science, some econ. Sorry, STEM majors.

(Source: ziriamundane, via readabookson)

likeafieldmouse:

Leonora Hamill - Art in Progress (2009-12)

Artist’s statement: 

Art in Progress is an exploration of art schools across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

I photograph empty studios in art schools marked with the richness of the activities undertaken by the students. These images, shot with a large format camera and printed analogically, are intentionally detailed, frontal and neutral. They invite the spectator to enter the studios in these schools and observe the freshly used tools of the trade which are perceived as traces that indicate, or allow us to imagine, the artistic experimentations that take place there.”

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

On money for education versus money for war

cognitivedissonance:

Rebloggable by request:

did cutting pell grant funding REALLY save money? isn’t education like. the Very Best Investment?

 sosungalittleclodofclay

Meg at Cognitive Dissonance:

You’d think that. Let’s get a little perspective. From FY2001 to the end of FY2012, taxpayers spent $1.4 trillion on the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. That’s $1,400,000,000,000. If you were to pile all those dollar bills and stick it on a scale, it would be about 1,543,235 tons. Or about 289 Chevy Silverado pickup trucks.

That’s pretty heavy.

You know what else is pretty heavy? Thinking about what we could have gotten for that money instead. Check it out:

  • 634.6 million Annual Energy Costs for a Household for One Year OR
  • 706.5 million Children Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
  • 20.3 million Elementary School Teachers for One Year OR
  • 133.4 million Fair Market Rent for One Bedroom Apartment for One Year OR
  • 181.3 million Head Start Slots for Children for One Year OR
  • 594.5 million Households Converted to All Solar Energy for One Year OR
  • 1.2 billion Households Converted to All Wind Energy for One Year OR
  • 176.7 million Military Veterans Receiving VA Medical Care for One Year OR
  • 658.5 million One Year Worth of Groceries for an Individual OR
  • 283.5 million People Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
  • 19.8 million Police or Sheriff’s Patrol Officers for One Year OR
  • 174.8 million Scholarships for University Students for One Year OR
  • 248.3 million Students receiving Pell Grants of $5550

You might say, “But that’s all the war spending! That’s not fair!” Here’s a few other comparisons. First, U.S. Defense spending for FY2012. That’s $544.3 billion. Here’s what we could get instead:

  • 279.0 million Children Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
  • 8.0 million Elementary School Teachers for One Year OR
  • 71.6 million Head Start Slots for Children for One Year OR
  • 234.8 million Households with Renewable Electricity - Solar Photovoltaic for One Year OR
  • 493.0 million Households with Renewable Electricity-Wind Power for One Year OR
  • 69.8 million Military Veterans Receiving VA Medical Care for One Year OR
  • 111.9 million People Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
  • 7.8 million Police or Sheriff’s Patrol Officers for One Year OR
  • 69.0 million Scholarships for University Students for One Year
  • OR 98.1 million Students receiving Pell Grants of $5550

Oh, but we need defense spending, right? Let’s examine weaponry. From 2001-2011, the U.S. fired over 11,000 Hellfire missiles in combat operations — keep in mind, this doesn’t count non-combat operations or testing. Each Hellfire costs roughly $68,000. That’s $748 million, or one year of full, $5,500 Pell Grants for 136,000 students.

Each F-16 Falcon Fighter costs $47 million. Or, 8,545 students could have Pell Grants of $5,550 for one year.

Each soldier in Afghanistan costs roughly $1.2 million per year. For that, we could give 218 students a full Pell Grant.

It’s not a question of cost. It’s a question of priorities. In FY2012, we spent $33.4 billion on Pell Grants — or six percent of the Department of Defense’s FY2012 budget.

But there’s always money for war, right? 

Cheers,

Meg

And let’s not forget that a lot of people sign up for military service because they have no other way to fund a college education.

(via )