1. Jindal and his allies want the public to see them as entirely sincere. They’re not trying to crush teachers’ unions, and they’re not on a privatization crusade, intent on destroying public institutions. They just want to help low-income children, even spending public funds to advance their goal.

    But their purported concern for the poor is literally unbelievable. When the issue is health care and housing, Jindal and other conservatives say struggling families should rely on the free market and their capacity to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. When the issue is education, suddenly the right cares deeply about disadvantaged children and is eager to “help.”

    When Jindal and other school voucher advocates are ready to assist “poor and disadvantaged” families in ways that don’t undermine public schools and teachers’ unions, I’ll gladly revisit the debate. Until then, this looks a lot like a scam.

     
  2. If this is the wave of the future, it makes nonsense of just about all the conventional wisdom on reducing inequality. Better education won’t do much to reduce inequality if the big rewards simply go to those with the most assets. Creating an “opportunity society”, or whatever it is the likes of Paul Ryan etc. are selling this week, won’t do much if the most important asset you can have in life is, well, lots of assets inherited from your parents. And so on.
    — 

    Paul Krugman (via azspot)

    People are going into debt for the majority of their lives in order to get the college degree that’s necessary for many jobs, yet that BA has become less and less valuable over time. Why should people invest so much in their training if it’s not going to pay off?

     
  3. wnycradiolab:

    proofmathisbeautiful:

    staceythinx:

    Chemistry crayon labels from the QueInteresante Etsy store.

    About the project: 

    Children play and draw with crayons practically every day, so why not make the experience more educational? This listing is for a set of 48 labels to stick in the crayons in a basic 48 pack of crayons so that while children are coloring, they are also exposed to the names of chemicals that will make those colors! So instead of thinking “I want green” they will think “I want Barium Nitrate Ba(NO3)2 Flame” and then when they take chemistry in high school and their teacher sets some gas on fire and it makes a green color and they ask the class what chemical it was your student will know it was Barium! Genius!

    WANT!!

    OK, yeah, this is pretty cool.

     
  4. For many men it is unthinkable that women could possess a technical competence equal to their own. Women would have to be paragons of competence to be accepted by male colleagues (Cockburn, 1985, 188)
    — 

    Finn, Geraldine. Voices of Women, Voices of Feminism: Limited Edition. Fernwood Publishing; Halifax. 1993. (pg. 113)

    Relevant: a recent study that found women face persistent gender bias in the sciences:

    Science professors at American universities widely regard female undergraduates as less competent than male students with the same accomplishments and skills, a new study by researchers at Yale concluded.

    I’d wager that you’d find similar results if you conducted the same experiment in other fields.

    (Source: gynocraticgrrl)

     
  5. I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else.
    — Toni Morrison  (via feministquotes)

    (Source: oprah.com)

     
  6. 19:12 6th Dec 2012

    Notes: 44633

    Reblogged from karnythia

    Tags: teachingeducationexams

    First, is this actually a boy?
Second, speaking as someone who has graded exams, this is just smug Tumblr nonsense. I doubt the grader didn’t notice the second paragraph—they just viewed it as extraneous. Just like I don’t grade outlines students make in their blue books to plan out their answers (unless they don’t offer anything else).
Students of Tumblr, listen up: you’re not graded on every mark you make on the page, but whether you answer the question and how good the answer is. This student did offer a pretty decent answer. And there were other parts to the test, which we aren’t seeing.
Humorless teacher killjoy, signing out.

    First, is this actually a boy?

    Second, speaking as someone who has graded exams, this is just smug Tumblr nonsense. I doubt the grader didn’t notice the second paragraph—they just viewed it as extraneous. Just like I don’t grade outlines students make in their blue books to plan out their answers (unless they don’t offer anything else).

    Students of Tumblr, listen up: you’re not graded on every mark you make on the page, but whether you answer the question and how good the answer is. This student did offer a pretty decent answer. And there were other parts to the test, which we aren’t seeing.

    Humorless teacher killjoy, signing out.

    (Source: pleatedjeans)

     
  7. vivvacious:

    spasticalactica:

    palisplace93:

    Israeli Soldiers stop Palestinian school-girls from going to school, Al Khalil-Hebron. You don’t want us to go to school, fine we’ll have school here. 

    Still winning ladies

    And this is the meaning of strength and courage.

    To give a little more context, I believe these photos are from last year. The IDF had tightened security and was making everyone who wanted to enter the area where the school is located undergo physical searches, which included going through metal detectors and x-ray machines. There were no longer any exceptions for pregnant women or people with health problems. So teachers started holding lessons at the checkpoint in protest. According to this timeline, settlers threw bottles and rocks at them and the IDF eventually fired tear gas at them when they refused to disperse. Life under occupation.

    (Source: almoqawama)

     
  8. As many as 15 percent of freshmen at America’s top schools are white students who failed to meet their university’s minimum standards for admission, according to Peter Schmidt, deputy editor of the Chronicle of Higher Education. These kids are “people with a long-standing relationship with the university,” or in other words, the children of faculty, wealthy alumni and politicians.

    According to Schmidt, these unqualified but privileged kids are nearly twice as common on top campuses as Black and Latino students who had benefited from affirmative action.

    — 

    Ten myths about affirmative action (via linzyxxxxx)

    This is EXTREMELY blatant on college campuses. The fact that these things need to be clarified is sad.

    (via newwavefeminism)

    Legacy is the real affirmative action…and yet we don’t see certain types of entitled people suing to dismantle that.

    (via invisiblelad)

    YUP I went to a school with so many kids like that. One dude had the nerve to go on and ON about affirmative action and how it was unfair and yet he was a legacy and his brother got into MIT because his father put in a call. Did he see any problem? Of course not.

    (via sunny1)

    (Source: sociolab)

     
  9. 01:00

    Notes: 1482

    Reblogged from readabookson

    Tags: resourceseducationbooks

    eBook tumblrs!

    ziriam:

    Also:

    http://fckvrso.wordpress.com/

    These collections are filled mostly with leftist theory, sociology, history, philosophy, political science, some econ. Sorry, STEM majors.

    (Source: ziriamundane)

     
  10. likeafieldmouse:

    Leonora Hamill - Art in Progress (2009-12)

    Artist’s statement: 

    Art in Progress is an exploration of art schools across Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas.

    I photograph empty studios in art schools marked with the richness of the activities undertaken by the students. These images, shot with a large format camera and printed analogically, are intentionally detailed, frontal and neutral. They invite the spectator to enter the studios in these schools and observe the freshly used tools of the trade which are perceived as traces that indicate, or allow us to imagine, the artistic experimentations that take place there.”

     
  11. On money for education versus money for war

    cognitivedissonance:

    Rebloggable by request:

    did cutting pell grant funding REALLY save money? isn’t education like. the Very Best Investment?

     sosungalittleclodofclay

    Meg at Cognitive Dissonance:

    You’d think that. Let’s get a little perspective. From FY2001 to the end of FY2012, taxpayers spent $1.4 trillion on the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. That’s $1,400,000,000,000. If you were to pile all those dollar bills and stick it on a scale, it would be about 1,543,235 tons. Or about 289 Chevy Silverado pickup trucks.

    That’s pretty heavy.

    You know what else is pretty heavy? Thinking about what we could have gotten for that money instead. Check it out:

    • 634.6 million Annual Energy Costs for a Household for One Year OR
    • 706.5 million Children Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
    • 20.3 million Elementary School Teachers for One Year OR
    • 133.4 million Fair Market Rent for One Bedroom Apartment for One Year OR
    • 181.3 million Head Start Slots for Children for One Year OR
    • 594.5 million Households Converted to All Solar Energy for One Year OR
    • 1.2 billion Households Converted to All Wind Energy for One Year OR
    • 176.7 million Military Veterans Receiving VA Medical Care for One Year OR
    • 658.5 million One Year Worth of Groceries for an Individual OR
    • 283.5 million People Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
    • 19.8 million Police or Sheriff’s Patrol Officers for One Year OR
    • 174.8 million Scholarships for University Students for One Year OR
    • 248.3 million Students receiving Pell Grants of $5550

    You might say, “But that’s all the war spending! That’s not fair!” Here’s a few other comparisons. First, U.S. Defense spending for FY2012. That’s $544.3 billion. Here’s what we could get instead:

    • 279.0 million Children Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
    • 8.0 million Elementary School Teachers for One Year OR
    • 71.6 million Head Start Slots for Children for One Year OR
    • 234.8 million Households with Renewable Electricity - Solar Photovoltaic for One Year OR
    • 493.0 million Households with Renewable Electricity-Wind Power for One Year OR
    • 69.8 million Military Veterans Receiving VA Medical Care for One Year OR
    • 111.9 million People Receiving Low-Income Healthcare for One Year OR
    • 7.8 million Police or Sheriff’s Patrol Officers for One Year OR
    • 69.0 million Scholarships for University Students for One Year
    • OR 98.1 million Students receiving Pell Grants of $5550

    Oh, but we need defense spending, right? Let’s examine weaponry. From 2001-2011, the U.S. fired over 11,000 Hellfire missiles in combat operations — keep in mind, this doesn’t count non-combat operations or testing. Each Hellfire costs roughly $68,000. That’s $748 million, or one year of full, $5,500 Pell Grants for 136,000 students.

    Each F-16 Falcon Fighter costs $47 million. Or, 8,545 students could have Pell Grants of $5,550 for one year.

    Each soldier in Afghanistan costs roughly $1.2 million per year. For that, we could give 218 students a full Pell Grant.

    It’s not a question of cost. It’s a question of priorities. In FY2012, we spent $33.4 billion on Pell Grants — or six percent of the Department of Defense’s FY2012 budget.

    But there’s always money for war, right? 

    Cheers,

    Meg

    And let’s not forget that a lot of people sign up for military service because they have no other way to fund a college education.

     
  12. The creepy paternalism of Hugo Schwyzer

    I’ve been reading some old commentary on Hugo Schwyzer due to this recent Tumblr post defending him, which was written by a woman who identifies him as a father figure. And I came across a blog post that explains why Schwyzer’s fatherliness is just more evidence why he can’t be trusted. He’s so sketchy that even other white male feminists are creeped the fuck out:

    Here’s how Schwyzer described his relationship to his students not long ago:

    Go ahead, call me paternalistic. I’ll wear that title with pride, thank you. I see my students not merely as independent, autonomous agents whom I need to empower, but as vulnerable young people whom I — and others around me — need to protect. And I still have the nerve to call myself a feminist.

    This notion that feminism calls him to protect the weak — to save them from themselves, to guide them to the right path — recurs again and again in his writing. As the co-organizer of the LA Slutwalk earlier this year, he referred to his role as “Herding sluts. In the best and most responsible way.” His students say he’s an electrifying lecturer, but complain that he severely restricts class discussion. And he frequently conceptualizes moral behavior as a matter of denial and restriction. (He has, for instance, described feminism as a “cold pool” in which “none of us can fully immerse ourselves forever.”)

    I don’t have any reason to believe that Hugo Schwyzer is likely to attempt another murder anytime soon. But the man who described his girlfriend as fragile and broken and in need of his sheltering strength as he plotted her death has not gone entirely away. The paternalistic impulse to save that young woman from herself — an impulse that came to him with “incredible clarity” then, one which he remembers “perfectly” today — is still in him, still driving him. It’s an impulse he’s redirected, but it remains unexamined, unchecked, and dangerous. (It particularly inflects and infects his writing about sexuality, about youth, and about people of color.)

    There’s nothing pro-women, feminist, or new about being a man who wants to rescue, protect, teach and otherwise be the master to women, particularly young and vulnerable women (like the one who wrote that Tumblr post). That’s pretty much the essence of patriarchy.

     
  13. image: Download

    boehner-trollolol:

Here is a picture of the unknown Penn State sorority that decided to do a Mexican theme, presumably for Halloween. 
As you can see, all the girls are wearing sombreros, fake mustaches and they have maracas in their hands. But the kickers are the two signs they have in the middle. One says “Will mow lawn for weed + beer” and the other says, “I don’t cut grass, I smoke it.”
Yeah.
This is racist. It’s insensitive, inaccurate, perpetuates harmful racial stereotypes and it’s a lazy attempt at a group costume. But if any of you recognize these women and/or know which sorority they’re a part of, please let me know in my ask box.
When I find out which sorority is responsible, I will report them to the University and to their national headquarters. They deserve to get their sorority suspended and get kicked out. 

Signal boost.
I’m especially ashamed and pissed off to see a few Asian faces in there. Do those girls not realize that their white ‘friends’ are just as likely to have a stereotypical Asian-themed party too? The sad thing is, they might not even care.

    boehner-trollolol:

    Here is a picture of the unknown Penn State sorority that decided to do a Mexican theme, presumably for Halloween. 

    As you can see, all the girls are wearing sombreros, fake mustaches and they have maracas in their hands. But the kickers are the two signs they have in the middle. One says “Will mow lawn for weed + beer” and the other says, “I don’t cut grass, I smoke it.”

    Yeah.

    This is racist. It’s insensitive, inaccurate, perpetuates harmful racial stereotypes and it’s a lazy attempt at a group costume. But if any of you recognize these women and/or know which sorority they’re a part of, please let me know in my ask box.

    When I find out which sorority is responsible, I will report them to the University and to their national headquarters. They deserve to get their sorority suspended and get kicked out. 

    Signal boost.

    I’m especially ashamed and pissed off to see a few Asian faces in there. Do those girls not realize that their white ‘friends’ are just as likely to have a stereotypical Asian-themed party too? The sad thing is, they might not even care.

     
  14. image: Download

    kohenari:

The Troubling Dean-to-Professor Ratio:

At universities nationwide, employment of administrators jumped 60 percent from 1993 to 2009, 10 times the growth rate for tenured faculty. “Administrative bloat is clearly contributing to the overall cost of higher education,” says Jay Greene, an education professor at the University of Arkansas. In a 2010 study, Greene found that from 1993 to 2007, spending on administration rose almost twice as fast as funding for research and teaching at 198 leading U.S. universities.

Presented without commentary … except to note, of course, that this doesn’t apply to any deans, provosts, or vice-chancellors who happen to read this blog!
HT: Jon Lunsford.

    kohenari:

    The Troubling Dean-to-Professor Ratio:

    At universities nationwide, employment of administrators jumped 60 percent from 1993 to 2009, 10 times the growth rate for tenured faculty. “Administrative bloat is clearly contributing to the overall cost of higher education,” says Jay Greene, an education professor at the University of Arkansas. In a 2010 study, Greene found that from 1993 to 2007, spending on administration rose almost twice as fast as funding for research and teaching at 198 leading U.S. universities.

    Presented without commentary … except to note, of course, that this doesn’t apply to any deans, provosts, or vice-chancellors who happen to read this blog!

    HT: Jon Lunsford.

     
  15. image: Download

    unapproachableblackchicks:


“[Of all] the things they [Republicans] have disliked about things that have gone on in the administration, they have never called a male unqualified, not bright…” Fudge (D-Ohio) said at a news conference called by a dozen women members of the House of Representatives. “There is a clear sexism and racism that goes with these comments being made by…Senator [John] McCain and others.” ….

McCain described Rice as “not very bright.” Rice graduated from Stanford University with honors, was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. at Oxford University.

McCain, who selected Sarah Palin as his running mate in 2008, finished 894th of 899th in his graduating class at the U.S. Naval Academy. According to the book, {The Nightingale’s Song} by Robert Timberg, he was a “below par” Navy pilot who lost five military aircrafts before being captured as a prisoner of war.


According to eurocentric standards of intelligence … who’s not so bright?




BOOM

    unapproachableblackchicks:

    “[Of all] the things they [Republicans] have disliked about things that have gone on in the administration, they have never called a male unqualified, not bright…” Fudge (D-Ohio) said at a news conference called by a dozen women members of the House of Representatives. “There is a clear sexism and racism that goes with these comments being made by…Senator [John] McCain and others.” ….


    McCain described Rice as “not very bright.” Rice graduated from Stanford University with honors, was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and earned a master’s degree and Ph.D. at Oxford University.


    McCain, who selected Sarah Palin as his running mate in 2008, finished 894th of 899th in his graduating class at the U.S. Naval Academy. According to the book, {The Nightingale’s Song} by Robert Timberg, he was a “below par” Navy pilot who lost five military aircrafts before being captured as a prisoner of war.



    According to eurocentric standards of intelligence … who’s not so bright?


    BOOM