1. image: Download

    laughingsquid:

Urban Air Project, Converting Billboards into Bamboo Gardens
     
  2. 00:41

    Notes: 109

    Reblogged from aleyma

    Tags: stained glassdesigndecorative artsdog

    aleyma:


Tobias and Sara on their Wedding Night, made in Germany, c.1520 (source).


I love that the artist depicted the family cat dog (where are my eyes?) curled up at the foot of the bed.

    aleyma:

    Tobias and Sara on their Wedding Night, made in Germany, c.1520 (source).

    I love that the artist depicted the family cat dog (where are my eyes?) curled up at the foot of the bed.

     
  3. image: Download

    elarogers:

Farmers’ Market!

You win this round, farmers.

    elarogers:

    Farmers’ Market!

    You win this round, farmers.

    (Source: juliannaaaa)

     
  4. 01:02

    Notes: 135

    Reblogged from aleyma

    Tags: designarmshistory

    aleyma:

Ceremonial saber of Archduke Ferdinand of Tyrol, made in Italy, c.1560 (source).

    aleyma:

    Ceremonial saber of Archduke Ferdinand of Tyrol, made in Italy, c.1560 (source).

     
  5. 00:58

    Notes: 454

    Reblogged from faico

    Tags: designantiquecryptographyhistory

    image: Download

    faico:


File:16th century French cypher machine in the shape of a book with arms of Henri II.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
16世紀フランスで作られた多表式換字暗号の暗号化マシーン。アンリ2世の浮き彫りが施されてる。


(via raurublock)

    faico:

    File:16th century French cypher machine in the shape of a book with arms of Henri II.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    16世紀フランスで作られた多表式換字暗号の暗号化マシーン。アンリ2世の浮き彫りが施されてる。

    (via raurublock)

     
  6. 00:36

    Notes: 9003

    Reblogged from thezeka

    Tags: iranarchitecturedesign

    phytos:

    The Shah Mosque of Isfahan

    Built during the Safavid period, it is an excellent example of Islamic architecture of Iran, and regarded as one of the masterpieces of Persian Architecture. The Shah Mosque of Isfahan is one of the everlasting masterpieces of architecture in Iran. It is registered, along with the Naghsh-i Jahan Square, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its construction began in 1611, and its splendor is mainly due to the beauty of its seven-colour mosaic tiles and calligraphic inscriptions.

    Photograph 1 by: Omid Jafarnezhad

    Photographs 2 - 6 by: ‘Horizon’ on Flickr.

    (Source: blue-voids)

     
  7. image: Download

    bookporn:

T. S. Elliot’s The Waste Land from Dimitri’s Bookbinding Corner.

    bookporn:

    T. S. Elliot’s The Waste Land from Dimitri’s Bookbinding Corner.

     
  8.  
  9. annie-wyatt:

    Favorite Books that shaped my life: Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

    So now do you see why books are hated and feared? They show the pores in the face of life. The comfortable people want only wax moon faces, poreless, hairless, expressionless. We are living in a time when flowers are trying to live on flowers, instead of growing on good rain and black loam. Even fireworks, for all their prettiness, come from the chemistry of the earth. Yet somehow we think we can grow, feeding on flowers and fireworks, without completing the cycle back to reality.

     
  10. Some horse bikes (a collection inspired by this post):

    Horsey' by Eungi Kim, a blue horse bike by Monarch, a horse motorcycle, a fox hunt costume by Katy Steudel

    There are others, but I think most of them are kind of creepy, with disembodied horse’s heads glued onto the handlebars. Look at this fucking thing:

    image

     
  11. likeafieldmouse:

    Leo Burnett - Raising the Roof (2010) - Awareness campaign for Canada’s homeless

    (Source: likeafieldmouse)

     
  12. merryplz:

andrewfishman:

Blake Fall-Conroy, “Minimum Wage Machine,” 2008-2010
This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like.  Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour.  This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York.  
This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary.  Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank.  A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank.  This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.  

ah yes totally mentioning this in my paper

    merryplz:

    andrewfishman:

    Blake Fall-Conroy, “Minimum Wage Machine,” 2008-2010

    This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like.  Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour.  This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York.  

    This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary.  Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank.  A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank.  This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.  

    ah yes totally mentioning this in my paper

     
  13. 15:34

    Notes: 732

    Reblogged from good

    Tags: designbicycletechgreensafety

    good:

A Stronger Bike Helmet, Made of Cardboard and Inspired by a Woodpecker- Adele Peters wrote in Health, Technology and Sustainability

When Anirudha Surabhi was a grad student at the Royal College of Art in London, he was in a bike accident. Even though it was a minor crash, and Surabhi was wearing an expensive helmet, the next day he learned that he had a concussion. He spent three days in the hospital. He wondered why the helmet hadn’t worked—and decided to explore the problem for his thesis project.

It turns out that bike helmets are not as safe as they’re portrayed to be. Over the last few decades, Surabhi says, some helmets have gotten more aerodynamic and better-looking, but they haven’t gotten any better at protecting us from injuries.
As he began working on his design, Surabhi looked at the anatomy of a woodpecker for inspiration. When a woodpecker slams its beak into the trunk of a tree, the impact is cushioned by a special micro-structure between the beak and head. By mirroring that structure—after testing 150 different materials—Surabhi was able to create a helmet that can withstand three times greater impact than a standard helmet. 

Special cardboard ribs inside the helmet are designed for flexibility. The cardboard itself has a honeycomb structure filled with air pockets to provide more cushioning. It’s stronger than a standard helmet liner, and lighter. 
It’s also greener than the ubiquitous polystyrene foam liners. Foam, unsurprisingly, is not great for the environment; the manufacturing process is a health hazard, and it also creates hazardous waste. It’s also more energy-intensive to produce than cardboard. Surabhi used 100 percent recycled cardboard, which he says takes no electricity to produce at all.
For the full design story, watch the video below. The helmet’s in production now, and Core77 reports that the first U.S. version of the helmet will be out next year through ABUS.
Watch video

Images courtesy of Anirudha Surabhi

    good:

    A Stronger Bike Helmet, Made of Cardboard and Inspired by a Woodpecker
    Adele Peters wrote in HealthTechnology and Sustainability

    When Anirudha Surabhi was a grad student at the Royal College of Art in London, he was in a bike accident. Even though it was a minor crash, and Surabhi was wearing an expensive helmet, the next day he learned that he had a concussion. He spent three days in the hospital. He wondered why the helmet hadn’t worked—and decided to explore the problem for his thesis project.

    image

    It turns out that bike helmets are not as safe as they’re portrayed to be. Over the last few decades, Surabhi says, some helmets have gotten more aerodynamic and better-looking, but they haven’t gotten any better at protecting us from injuries.

    As he began working on his design, Surabhi looked at the anatomy of a woodpecker for inspiration. When a woodpecker slams its beak into the trunk of a tree, the impact is cushioned by a special micro-structure between the beak and head. By mirroring that structure—after testing 150 different materials—Surabhi was able to create a helmet that can withstand three times greater impact than a standard helmet. 

    image

    Special cardboard ribs inside the helmet are designed for flexibility. The cardboard itself has a honeycomb structure filled with air pockets to provide more cushioning. It’s stronger than a standard helmet liner, and lighter. 

    It’s also greener than the ubiquitous polystyrene foam liners. Foam, unsurprisingly, is not great for the environment; the manufacturing process is a health hazard, and it also creates hazardous waste. It’s also more energy-intensive to produce than cardboard. Surabhi used 100 percent recycled cardboard, which he says takes no electricity to produce at all.

    For the full design story, watch the video below. The helmet’s in production now, and Core77 reports that the first U.S. version of the helmet will be out next year through ABUS.

    Watch video

    Images courtesy of Anirudha Surabhi

     
  14. 02:52

    Notes: 26183

    Reblogged from forgeries

    Tags: bill nyescienceinteriorsdesigngreen

    forgeries:

    A Science Guy’s Place in the Sun: How Bill Nye keeps his home humming with solar panels, energy-efficient windows and a range of green gadgets.

     
  15. ourpresidents:

“The Right Drink for the Conservative Taste”
During the 1960s, campaign advertising appeared on some unusual consumer products.  This can of “Gold Water” was made in support of Republican Candidate Barry Goldwater. 
The Democrats also had cans of “Johnson Juice” for Lyndon B. Johnson.
Cheers!
-from the Truman Library

"Mmmm…tastes like freedom!"

    ourpresidents:

    “The Right Drink for the Conservative Taste”

    During the 1960s, campaign advertising appeared on some unusual consumer products.  This can of “Gold Water” was made in support of Republican Candidate Barry Goldwater. 

    The Democrats also had cans of “Johnson Juice” for Lyndon B. Johnson.

    Cheers!

    -from the Truman Library

    "Mmmm…tastes like freedom!"