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    elarogers:

Life within death.


Physalis alkekengi, or the Chinese/Japanese Lantern, blooms during Winter and dries during Spring. Once it is dried, the bright red fruit is seen. The outer cover is a thin mesh that held the flower petals, seen in golden brown colour.

    elarogers:

    Life within death.

    Physalis alkekengi, or the Chinese/Japanese Lantern, blooms during Winter and dries during Spring. Once it is dried, the bright red fruit is seen. The outer cover is a thin mesh that held the flower petals, seen in golden brown colour.

     
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    nybg:

The Secret Behind a Stradivarius—Imperfection
You might not guess that the story of the Stradivarius violins has anything to do with botany, but—if sometimes indirectly—it often does. To that end, I like to follow along with these stories much as I can; the tale keeps growing as scientists conjure up ever more complex means of understanding the finest instruments made to date.
As of now, research suggests that one of the reasons for the transcendant sound behind the instruments of luthiers Stradivari and Guadagnini might be the mini ice age that took place during their construction. The cold snap that followed Europe through much of the 17th and 18th centuries may have stunted the trees near the luthiers’ town of Cremona such that it created a dense, more harmonically agreeable wood.
There’s also the theory that a fungal infection of the trees used to make these violins had a helping hand in that sweet sound. But now, scientists suggest another factor: wood that’s been eaten through by bugs, cracked, and patched with new wood and paper. The thought that the asymmetry of sheer wear and tear could have something to do with the wood’s sound might be the key to this code. Then again, I suspect we’ll continue to investigate these multi-million-dollar masterpieces if only because the mystique demands it. —MN

    nybg:

    The Secret Behind a Stradivarius—Imperfection

    You might not guess that the story of the Stradivarius violins has anything to do with botany, but—if sometimes indirectly—it often does. To that end, I like to follow along with these stories much as I can; the tale keeps growing as scientists conjure up ever more complex means of understanding the finest instruments made to date.

    As of now, research suggests that one of the reasons for the transcendant sound behind the instruments of luthiers Stradivari and Guadagnini might be the mini ice age that took place during their construction. The cold snap that followed Europe through much of the 17th and 18th centuries may have stunted the trees near the luthiers’ town of Cremona such that it created a dense, more harmonically agreeable wood.

    There’s also the theory that a fungal infection of the trees used to make these violins had a helping hand in that sweet sound. But now, scientists suggest another factor: wood that’s been eaten through by bugs, cracked, and patched with new wood and paper. The thought that the asymmetry of sheer wear and tear could have something to do with the wood’s sound might be the key to this code. Then again, I suspect we’ll continue to investigate these multi-million-dollar masterpieces if only because the mystique demands it. —MN

     
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    Orchis italica, photo by Ana Retamero Olmos:

These  two little pink men arm in arm are actually the flower heads of the  Mediterranean orchid Orchis italica. The English name “naked man orchid”  describes the shapes of the blossoms very well indeed.   After I took  some photographs of the whole plant, I kept going into more and more  detail until I finally found these two blossoms. I placed them in the  centre and tried to arrange the surrounding flowers in a way that would  make them appear like mythical creatures flying around the pair.

    Orchis italica, photo by Ana Retamero Olmos:

    These two little pink men arm in arm are actually the flower heads of the Mediterranean orchid Orchis italica. The English name “naked man orchid” describes the shapes of the blossoms very well indeed.   After I took some photographs of the whole plant, I kept going into more and more detail until I finally found these two blossoms. I placed them in the centre and tried to arrange the surrounding flowers in a way that would make them appear like mythical creatures flying around the pair.