This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
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ras-al-ghul-is-dead:

A silent protest in Love Park, downtown Philadelphia orchestrated by performance artists protesting the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson. The onslaught of passerby’s  wanting to take photos with the statue exemplifies the disconnect in American society.  Simply frame out the dead body, and it doesn’t exist.  

Here are some observations by one of the artists involved in the event:

I don’t know who any of these folks are.

They were tourists I presume.

But I heard most of what everything they said. A few lines in particular stood out. There’s one guy not featured in the photos. His friends were trying to get him to join the picture but he couldn’t take his eyes off the body.

"Something about this doesn’t feel right. I’m going to sit this one out, guys." "Com’on man… he’s already dead."

(Laughs.)

There were a billion little quips I heard today. Some broke my heart. Some restored my faith in humanity. There was an older white couple who wanted to take a picture under the statue.

The older gentleman: “Why do they have to always have to shove their politics down our throats.” Older woman: “They’re black kids, honey. They don’t have anything better to do.”

One woman even stepped over the body to get her picture. But as luck would have it the wind blew the caution tape and it got tangle around her foot. She had to stop and take the tape off. She still took her photo.

There was a guy who yelled at us… “We need more dead like them. Yay for the white man!”

"One young guy just cried and then gave me a hug and said ‘thank you. It’s nice to know SOMEBODY sees me.’

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

missannavaldez:

new work! 
"References"
oil on canvas. 80 x 70 inches. 2014

missannavaldez:

new work! 

"References"

oil on canvas. 80 x 70 inches. 2014

(via bedbugsbiting)

art-and-fury:

Philippe Caza illustrations from Les Monstres du Placard #1, 70s

(previous)

art-and-fury:

Philippe Caza illustrations from Les Monstres du Placard #1, 70s

(previous)

(via theremina)

hifructosemag:

cross-connect:

Marc Giai-Miniet  is a French artist who makes creepy and fascinating dioramas that tend to feature reproductions of human organs, crime scenes, submarines in basements and wait for it … libraries.

The miniature tableaus are terrific examples of art’s ability to transform seemingly predictable, mundane scenarios into absurd, freakish, and beautiful visual experiences.

Giai-Miniet’s libraries are detailed and striking, replete with book cover art, author names, and identifiable typography. Occasionally a diorama’s title will conjure a loose narrative, an obscure starting point from which the viewer might further consider the art via

:)

euo:

Jenny Holzer Packaged latex condoms with printed text “Men don’t protect you anymore”

euo:

Jenny Holzer
Packaged latex condoms with printed text
“Men don’t protect you anymore”

(via cash91)

loverofbeauty:

Made in Japan

loverofbeauty:

Made in Japan

(Source: meganseptember)

Trophy Scarves”, a series by performance artist, Nate Hill. Artist’s statement: “I wear white women for status and power.” Read this for some context.

paintdeath:

Kenne Gregoire, 1951

paintdeath:

Kenne Gregoire, 1951

(via bedbugsbiting)

neomexicanismos:

Spencer Tunick en la Ciudad de México

neomexicanismos:

Spencer Tunick en la Ciudad de México

(via nezua)

hifructosemag:

likeafieldmouse:

Sarah Schönfeld - All You Can Feel

"Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences as the products of a so-called ‘chemical self’. We can explain moods, angers and diseases both physiological and psychological as an imbalance of substances in the body.

All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood-altering substances.

What do all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted?

Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had
already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film.

Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200cm.”

1. Valium

2. Ketamine

3. Speed

4. Crystal Meth

5. Solian

6. Magic

7. Orphiril

8. Pharmaceutical Speed

9. Dopamine 

10. Cocaine

The literal negative effects of drugs (on negatives)

tierradentro:

“Medea”, 1868, William Wetmore Story.

tierradentro:

Medea”, 1868, William Wetmore Story.

(via theremina)

hugonebula:

Master glassblower and stained glass artist Loren Stump in California has wowed the internet with an extraordinary display of virtuosity. He created a “loaf” of glass, called murrine, out of carefully layered glass rods that, when sliced, reveal a painstakingly detailed work of art in cross-section.

"The most impressive thing about his work is that the resulting image can only be seen in its entirety after the murrini is cut…"

(via Artist Creates Glass Loaves That Can Be Sliced Into Beautiful Portraits Like Bread | Bored Panda)

(via cundtcake)

somewhatbadasslol:

STORM, CAPTAIN MARVEL, WONDER WOMAN & SHE HULK by - http://rahzzah.deviantart.com/gallery/

I especially love She Hulk.

(via lostinhistory)

rodolfo9999:

After Paul Stankard battled with undiagnosed dyslexia in his youth, he struggled to find his life’s calling. 

It wasn’t until college that he discovered scientific glass blowing, which is the manual process of creating scientific instruments out of glass.

For 10 years Stankard worked on making industrial glass, but it was while experimenting with glass in his garage that he finally found his passion in life: paperweights.

Since finding his calling, Stankard has become a pioneer in the studio glass movement.

His paperweights celebrate the primal beauty of nature on a more intimate level.

Stankard says each piece integrates mysticism with botanical realism, giving the glass “organic credibility.”

And today, his work can be found in more than 60 museums worldwide, including the Smithsonian, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and even the Louvre.

(via wisdomlockedin)

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Marble statue of Lucifer or Evil genius, by William Geefs (1848) at the Cathedral of St. Paul de Liège (Belgium)

(via asylum-art)