This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
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nezua:

sugaritslikeparadise:

4thofjulys:

LET’S TAKE A MOMENT TO ACTUALLY THANK THE PEOPLE WHO GAVE US THIS FREEODM.

I don’t care what your political beliefs are, these men and women are heroes

Nope. My mother and the universe gave me freedom. These people are pawns of imperialism, and regularly destabilize the growth and happiness of much of the world.

LET’S TAKE A MOMENT TO ACTUALLY THANK THE PEOPLE WHO GAVE US THIS FREEODM (SIC).”
YEAH LET’S DO THAT

nezua:

sugaritslikeparadise:

4thofjulys:

LET’S TAKE A MOMENT TO ACTUALLY THANK THE PEOPLE WHO GAVE US THIS FREEODM.

I don’t care what your political beliefs are, these men and women are heroes

Nope. My mother and the universe gave me freedom. These people are pawns of imperialism, and regularly destabilize the growth and happiness of much of the world.

LET’S TAKE A MOMENT TO ACTUALLY THANK THE PEOPLE WHO GAVE US THIS FREEODM (SIC).

YEAH LET’S DO THAT

(Source: literallyrad)

snarkbender:

positivelypersistentteach:

A Customer Walked Into a Hobby Lobby, and Told Them What We’re All Thinking

this is neat & all, but I think this falls under the heading of “making unnecessary extra work for the low-wage folks who didn’t make the decision you’re protesting”.
I mean seriously, the heads of the company don’t straighten the aisles in stores, and there’s little likelihood any of them would ever see this. or care.

Ugh, don’t do this. You’re just making the lives of the lowest level employees harder.
If you’re mad, write to the owners of Hobby Lobby, start a boycott, write to your congressperson, invoke the Old Ones through dark rituals, but don’t mess with store displays and take pics to put on your Twitter feed or Facebook or whatever.

snarkbender:

positivelypersistentteach:

A Customer Walked Into a Hobby Lobby, and Told Them What We’re All Thinking

this is neat & all, but I think this falls under the heading of “making unnecessary extra work for the low-wage folks who didn’t make the decision you’re protesting”.

I mean seriously, the heads of the company don’t straighten the aisles in stores, and there’s little likelihood any of them would ever see this. or care.

Ugh, don’t do this. You’re just making the lives of the lowest level employees harder.

If you’re mad, write to the owners of Hobby Lobby, start a boycott, write to your congressperson, invoke the Old Ones through dark rituals, but don’t mess with store displays and take pics to put on your Twitter feed or Facebook or whatever.

covenesque:

I def remember the riots and one thing anti black Koreans always fail to remember is that cops didn’t want to help Koreans during the riots either and left their asses to protect rich white people across town.

And lol, I def remember stories of apologies and cleanup efforts by ppl in the community, but people like op have severe selective memory

Yes! Fostering enmity and suspicion between Korean Americans and African Americans (or any POC) only serves white supremacy.

This is why I have no patience with Asians who drink the white establishment Kool-Aid. It’s not only morally wrong to be racist, but it’s so stupid and self-defeating. It may make you feel useful to be used as a stick to beat up other people of color, but you know what people do with sticks once they’re done using them? They throw them away. Aping the master doesn’t mean you’ll be the master someday. You’re only reinforcing the bonds that are keeping you in your place in the racial hierarchy.

It’s funny how a (biased) memory of the LA riots remains alive in Asian American consciousness, but not the history of POC solidarity movements that began in the 1960s with African American organization and aid. We should be inspired by the latter memory, not dwelling on the former. But it serves the white establishment better to sensationalize stories about inter-ethnic conflict than to talk about inter-ethnic coalition efforts.

(via covenesque)

reallifedocumentarian:

ankh-kush:

This has gotta be the coolest thing I’ve ever seen on the internet
Black Panther Party and the Asian American Political Alliance

The very birth of the term Asian American came from a rejection of white supremacy, institutional racism and in full support of Black Power [via the Asian American Political Alliance, particularly in regards to the work being done by the Black Panthers]. We stood together. Some of us still stand together. We must stand together again.
I fucking love this gif.

reallifedocumentarian:

ankh-kush:

This has gotta be the coolest thing I’ve ever seen on the internet

Black Panther Party and the Asian American Political Alliance

The very birth of the term Asian American came from a rejection of white supremacy, institutional racism and in full support of Black Power [via the Asian American Political Alliance, particularly in regards to the work being done by the Black Panthers]. We stood together. Some of us still stand together. We must stand together again.

I fucking love this gif.

(via provocatoria)

Personally, I think a lot of these animal rights causes smell a bit. Of course people should treat animals with respect. They shouldn’t be used to test cosmetics or used to make music videos. But I don’t get the difference between eating some carrots and eating a rabbit. How much difference is there between cutting down trees to make a book and cooking up a lamb chop?

Don’t misunderstand - I think groups like Greenpeace have done many brilliant things. But there are also problems with Greenpeace. When the orginization began, many of its members were from Germany. For them to march into Greenland and tell the indigenous people to stop killing seals is completly ridiculous.

What right have these people, from big industrial cities like Frankfurt, which contribute a lot of pollution, to tell people who live in harmony with nature not to eat seals? What are they supposed to eat? Snow?

Björk on animal rights. (via babydeer) (via ericmortensen, bowfolk) (via sillyvegans) (via garrettpwnsall) (via silhouetteofaskeleton) (via hydri) (via major—minus) (via betheothergirl) (via chakrabot) (via birdsy-purplefish)

I think the difference is that rabbits can feel pain and trees can’t. But her point still stands—a lot of these people have their priorities screwed up. Working to preserve habitats or slowing down climate change will help more animals than attempting to destroy indigenous cultures. But I guess brown people are an easier target for activists than western society.

Victoria’s Secret does NOT heart consent. Young customers play prank on lingerie giant.

upsettingrapeculture:

Yesterday, young facebook users hi-jacked the social media outlets of Victoria’s Secret to promote something very different from panties and push-up bras. Within ten hours, over 50,000 people visited PinkLovesConsent.com, where they saw Victoria’s Secret’s image “promoting consent to fight rape.”

The satirical website was launched at noon on Monday, December 3. According to the site, “PINK loves CONSENT is our newest collection of flirty, sexy and powerful statements that remind people to practice CONSENT. CONSENT is a verbal agreement about how and when people are comfortable having sex.”

Through Victoria’s Secret’s social media, the concept of consent was cropping up in some unexpected places. The Victoria’s Secret facebook pages were flooded with “I heart consent” posts, excited campus reps were retweeting pinklovesconsent.com, and the “pink hearts” at pinknation.com were declaring their love for “open sex talk.” One employee tweeted, “I am so happy to currently have a job for a company that stands for something so beautiful!! @LoveConsent #victoriassecret #loveconsent”  Highschool students were tweeting “I’m loving the new @LoveConsent! Victoria’s secret goes feminist!” At the outset, 100 young facebook users were in one the prank. It just went viral from there.  

How did customers respond to the prank? Victoria’s Secret fighting rape? Some people were skeptical, some people were confused, and most people LOVED it.  

The pr@pinklovesconsent.com inbox was flooded with fan mail from over-joyed customers.

“Hey, I just wanted to say that I am really incredibly happy about PINK’s consent line. It’s really encouraging to see mainstream clothing that promotes women’s safety and choice while still being fashionable and letting her feel good about her body. I wasn’t a Victoria’s Secret customer before, but I sure as hell am now

“Dear Anyone who made this happen at VS,
Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! As a college student, and as someone who is constantly trying to create awareness of consent and body image awareness, I love this. As someone who is a survivor of assault, I love this. I love this times a million. I am floored, and a proud customer. I will flaunt these the minute I am able to buy them.”


Why should Victoria’s Secret (or anyone) promote consent? To end rape. By the time American women graduate from college 1 in 4 will have been raped. Every 21 hours, a rape occurs on an American college campus. Women are twice as likely to be raped in their lifetime than to develop breast cancer.  

Turns out feminist duo FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture is behind the campaign. Just last month, on the eve of the last presidential election, the same team projected “Rape Is Rape,” along with stories of survivors, onto the US Capitol Building. FORCE says, “We envision a world where sex is empowering and pleasurable rather than coercive and violent.”

Will Victoria’s Secret take a nod from the customer fan mail and change their styles? Fighting rape would be a major shift for the brand. Though they are a woman-focused company, VS has never taken a stand on any women’s issue. In fact, their current designs seem to lean more toward rape culture than consent. Their PINK brand, marketed at high school and college-aged women, sports thongs with the slogan “SURE THING” printed right over the crotch. Young women across the country are wearing underwear with “SURE THING” literally printed over their vaginas. We can think of one circumstance where a vagina is treated like a “SURE THING”: rape.

So if Victoria’s Secret clearly would NEVER promote consent why use their brand for a consent campaign? The organizers say, “We could write a pamphlet about consent.  In fact, we have written and distributed pamphlets about consent.  But how many people are reading pamphlets about sexual practices and how many people are reading facebook post about Victoria’s Secret? Consent needs to become a mainstream idea. Condoms became a mainstream idea in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Just like pausing to put on a condom prevents the spread of STDs, pausing to check in with you partner prevents unwanted sexual experiences.

Social media is becoming a tool for social change. We have seen the role of social media in revolution in the Arab Spring, but change Victoria’s Secret? “Probably not,” says the organizers.  “We’re not about taking Victoria’s Secret down.  We are about changing the conversation. The sexiness that is being sold to women by Victoria’s Secret is not actually about sex. It is not how to have sex, relationships or orgasms. It in an IMAGE of what it is to be sexy. So while we are sold cleavage, white teeth, clear skin and perfect hair no one is asking us how our bodies feel and what we desire. Victoria’s Secret owns the image of female sexuality, instead of women owning their own sexuality.”

As the project went viral, some saw right through the shenanigans. Many who knew it was a prank openly wished that it was real.  After a first incredulous look and some detective work, Jezebel blogger Katie J.M. Baker said, “If only Victoria’s Secret focused on empowering women rather than objectifying them!” Bloggers wrote about how the Pink Loves Consent project makes women look powerful and strong. Jezebel users commented on the “fiercely real” body types represented on the site. “Too bad they don’t use some models like her for their regular advertising. The girl’s gorgeous and it’s awesome to see a different body style once in awhile.” A frustrated Facebook user commented, “Damn, I wish these were real. I just got paid.”   And a savvy Victoria’s Secret customer tweeted, “So I guess the #loveconsent campaign isn’t actually affiliated with Victoria’s Secret but they SHOULD BE I WOULD BUY SO MUCH UNDERWEAR.”

Why do so many women love something they know is not real? FORCE made something that people want, but that a company like Victoria’s Secret can never give them. Imagine how different our lives would be if we put as much time and thought into sharing ideas like consent as we do into selling underwear.

As one high school student eloquently blogged:

“i’m still freaking out over this pink loves consent thing. And people say nothing’s gonna change, that talking and educating doesn’t help. Watch how many people will second-guess their actions when a widely popular company is pushing the issue. This is so fucking cool.”
—a seventeen year-old high school student posted on tumblr

We are so sorry to tell young women that Victoria’s Secret is not using its voice to create the change you need to grow up safe and free from sexual violence. Victoria’s Secret is not using its brand to promote consent. They are not promoting consent to their 4.5 million “PINK nation” members, to the 500,000 facebook fans or the estimated 10 million viewers who will be watching tonight’s fashion show. But what a different world would it be if they did?  What if consent and communication showed up in the bedroom as much as push-up bras and seamless thongs?  Things WILL change and talking and education DOES help.  We can create a culture where the sexual empowerment of women is more common than their sexual assault. But it’s going to take some work to keep on fighting against the messaging from giants like Victoria’s Secret.

While we can’t expect a message that is empowering for women to come from a brand like Victoria’s Secret, we can make it come from their hashtag. This campaign has only begun.

Tonight you can celebrate the annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show by joining more than one thousand social media activists who will be posting, pinning and tweeting about consent. Join the CONSENT REVOLUTION! Tweet at #VictoriasSecret why you #loveconsent. Facebook @VictoriasSecret about why @loveconsent is revolutionary. Combat the sickening reality of rape culture by making the culture of consent go viral!

I didn’t like the idea of VS or anyone else trying to make money off of rape culture. At all. But I mind this idea less now that it’s clear it was a stunt to raise awareness. And the women behind it have a point—people (including journalists) are going to pay a lot more attention when a big company like Victoria’s Secret does something like this than when feminists do it.

(via horrible-princess)

blackvintage:

 

Passive Resistance Training, SNCC, Atlanta, GA, 1960, by James Karales, courtesy Duke University Library

blackvintage:

Passive Resistance Training, SNCC, Atlanta, GA, 1960, by James Karales, courtesy Duke University Library

unhistorical:

November 20, 1969: The Occupation of Alcatraz begins.

On this day in 1969, seventy-nine Native Americans, mostly student protesters, set out in a boat to occupy the San Francisco Bay’s famous island prison at Alcatraz (“the Rock”). In this highly-publicized event, occupiers protested the American government’s policy in dealing with Native Americans, particularly its numerous broken treaties with Native American tribes and its policy of Indian termination. The protest was somewhat effective in achieving recognition for the latter issue; in 1970, President Nixon delivered to Congress a message in which he criticized termination and instead recommended self-determination, and throughout the 70s, the federal government passed legislation that attempted to promote the sovereignty of Native American tribes. During this period, President Nixon also more than doubled the budget of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. 

The principal organizer of the occupation was Adam Fortunate Eagle, a half-Chippewa activist; the spokesperson for the Indians of All Tribes organization was part-Sioux, part-Mexican activist John Trudell; another leader was Richard Oakes, a Mohawk Indian who lived with his family on Alcatraz until 1970 and sent this message to the San Francisco Department of the Interior:

We invite the United States to acknowledge the justice of our claim. The choice now lies with the leaders of the American government - to use violence upon us as before to remove us from our Great Spirit’s land, or to institute a real change in its dealing with the American Indian…

We and all other oppressed peoples would welcome spectacle of proof before the world of your title by genocide. Nevertheless, we seek peace.

When the Ohlone and other indigenous peoples inhabited the San Francisco Bay Area, Alcatraz was regarded with suspicion, and it was even used as a place of exile and ostracism. It was abandoned as a federal penitentiary in 1963, and it was subsequently claimed by the 1969 protesters by “right of discovery”, the doctrine used to justify the acquisition of native-held lands by colonial powers (especially in the 19th century). The occupation lasted until 1971, and, for nineteen months, students, married couples, and even children lived on the island, garnering support from even celebrities like Jane Fonda and Marlon Brando. The last protesters left in June of 1971, after electrical power and telephone lines were cut off by the government. The occupation’s stated goal of creating a spiritual and cultural center on the island was never fulfilled, and most of the activists’ demands were never met, but it was influential overall, especially given its direct effect on federal policy toward Native Americans. 

photograph collection

(via mardesalinidad-deactivated20130)

theteratophile:

jalwhite:

fracturedrefuge:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.
Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

This is really powerful.

Wow, I had no idea about the solidarity patch.
This is still so powerful to watch.

(fyi Australian guy’s name is Peter Norman, he was banned from competing internationally for Australia after this, because our government can be a real sack of dicks sometimes)

I had no idea there was so much going on here. It’s fascinating. According to the Wiki article:

The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments. Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his…It was…Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand…differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.

theteratophile:

jalwhite:

fracturedrefuge:

whatgodzillasaidtogod:

talldarkbishoujo:

wretchedoftheearth:

I’ve never seen a GIF of this.

I was just reading about this during a wiki binge on Olympics incidents and did a little research on it. I never knew how deep the message was that Smith and Carlos were trying to send. Just about everything they wore and how they wore it had symbolism attached to it. (unzipped tracksuits for solidarity with blue collar workers, necklace of beads for lynching victims, etc) Calling it a “black power salute” is really reductive and it’s a shame (and predictable) that if it’s taught at all, that’s what it’s boiled down to.

Another thing I didn’t know: the Australian guy who came in second wore a patch for solidarity with them, he was protesting racist Australian immigration policies. When he passed away, Smith and Carlos were pallbearers at his funeral.

Don’t know what this is referring to? Here you go.

This is really powerful.

Wow, I had no idea about the solidarity patch.

This is still so powerful to watch.

(fyi Australian guy’s name is Peter Norman, he was banned from competing internationally for Australia after this, because our government can be a real sack of dicks sometimes)

I had no idea there was so much going on here. It’s fascinating. According to the Wiki article:

The two U.S. athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue collar workers in the U.S. and wore a necklace of beads which he described “were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.” All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia’s White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. Sociologist Harry Edwards, the founder of the OPHR, had urged black athletes to boycott the games; reportedly, the actions of Smith and Carlos on 16 October 1968 were inspired by Edwards’ arguments. Both U.S. athletes intended on bringing black gloves to the event, but Carlos forgot his…It was…Peter Norman, who suggested Carlos wear Smith’s left-handed glove, this being the reason behind him raising his left hand…differing from the traditional Black Power salute. When “The Star-Spangled Banner” played, Smith and Carlos delivered the salute with heads bowed, a gesture which became front page news around the world. As they left the podium they were booed by the crowd. Smith later said “If I win, I am American, not a black American. But if I did something bad, then they would say I am a Negro. We are black and we are proud of being black. Black America will understand what we did tonight.

(Source: bloggingisnotwriting, via omskivar)

realfakescientist:

The reality of minorities when spoken about honestly is considered slander by the majority. “Unity” and “compromise” usually means the the dilution of the minority’s ground and the compromise is never that because it is one-sided, just enough to where the majority feels comfortable.

(Source: alscientist, via snarkbender)

strugglingtobeheard:

Trayvon Martin’s parents launch fund to fight stand-your-ground laws

sinidentidades:

The parents of Trayvon Martin have launched a website and a political action committee aimed at fighting the proliferation of stand-your-ground laws.

Change For Trayvon will collect funds to be “distributed to candidates, elected officials and efforts which support the mission of … revising stand-your-ground laws across the nation to ensure there is judicial or prosecutorial oversight”.

A video on the website shows Martin’s father, Tracy Martin, and mother, Sybrina Fulton, sitting side by side, urging viewers to join their campaign. “We need your help to change the laws which keep parents like ourselves from finding peace,” Tracy Martin says.

The fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman, a neighbourhood watch volunteer in Sanford, Florida, prompted weeks of protest and racially charged debate. Police cited Florida’s stand-your-ground law, which allows the use of deadly force if threatened, in their decision not to arrest the gunman.

Zimmerman, who claims he shot the unarmed 17-year-old in self-defence, was eventually charged with second-degree murder and is out on bail awaiting trial.

(via so-treu)

Dumping on low-wage workers is lousy direct action / Waging Nonviolence - People-Powered News and Analysis →

thehighshelf:

differentclasswar:

I couldn’t decide on a chunk of this piece to blockquote; it’s a longer, drawn out version of my post from last week about leaving a mess at Walmart as “direct action.” 

This seems like a nice example of self-serving garbage behavior:

Last year, as Susie Cagle reported, Occupy Oakland and other groups prepared a Black Friday action that was meant to disrupt the flow of commerce. Occupiers filled carts with merchandise, got into line, and then left the full carts there, moving on to another big box retailer.

Oh my god. Don’t do this shit, people. Don’t pay for your Walmart purchases with a jar of pennies. Don’t deface signage. Don’t do anything that makes the employees’ lives more difficult. Your store-level ‘actions’ are not cute or clever and don’t affect the people in charge at all. The linked article makes a very good point:

“You don’t want to talk for them, because they have their own mouths,” Quadeer Porter, who had organized the action at the Walmart in Kearny, N.J., told me. “But you see civil disservice being done, you stand up.”

That’s the essence of solidarity action: Don’t assume that you know what is best for the people being impacted, because they can speak for themselves. You will do better if you are working together.

That principle sound familiar? It’s the same advice all allies should follow: If you truly care about helping, then assisting the people who have been getting shit on with carrying out their actions and plans is the way to go. Don’t appoint yourself leader. Shut up and listen.Don’t make yourself the center of fucking attention. Don’t put your priorities above theirs.

(via madrassoup)

wyveraryborealis:

Unless you literally are them, you are not Savita Halappanavar. You are not Gaza. You are not Trayvon Martin. You are not, for that matter, Huskies or Hokies. It’s a weird thing to say, it’s extremely appropriative, and it does nothing but make it about you. It doesn’t feel like solidarity when people start doing that to your life, it feels like someone’s stolen your grief.

You’re wearing someone else’s tragedy like a costume. Don’t do it.

The “we are [x]” sentiment is something I identify with leftism—unions striking in support of labor in other industries and especially marginalized brown peoples linking their oppressions under white supremacy and imperialism. So Mexicans who live near in dangerous areas along the U.S. border might explicitly liken their situation to what’s happening to Palestinians. There are South Africans who talk about what’s happening in Gaza in terms of apartheid.

And those are just the more recent examples. The original Black Panther Party expressed solidarity with the Vietnamese people because black radicals saw the common sources (capitalism, white supremacy, etc.) of struggles for justice and equality around the world. Eldredge Cleaver wrote, “if the nations of Asia, Latin America and Africa are strong and free, the black man in America will be safe and secure and free to live in dignity and self-respect.”

This was an era when brown leftist activists worked hard to create coalitions among nonwhites by pointing out how the same basic structures and systems oppressed brown people all around the world. Coining and using specific phrases and labels to emphasize unity and solidarity was one way of accomplishing that. So terms like “women of color" emerged as a a political identity around which nonwhite women could rally, which could be used to increase their voice, resources, etc. And if you look at galleries of old leftist posters, it’s common to see slogans like, “Victory! Vietnam-Palestine" and "Laos: Their Struggle is Our Struggle" that explicitly link one resistance movement with another. The "we are [x]" phrase is something used by oppressed peoples to emphasize the commonality of their struggles against shared foes like western imperialism or white racism. 

So in my view, that history makes it doubly problematic when a privileged person does the whole, “we are all Trayvon” or “we are all Savita” thing. It not only appropriates the tragedy and lived experience of that individual brown person, but it waters down the meaningfulness and power of the “we are [x]” assertion into a generic expression of sympathy. Even when you’re advocating for a progressive cause, that doesn’t mean you can forget about your privilege.

(via curiousgeorgiana)

lipstick-feminists:

youcanquotemethat:

Tonight, right now, over two thousand infuriated Irishmen and Women have gathered outside the Dáil in protest over the death of Savita Halappanavar, who died of septicaemia in Galway University Hospital after she had a miscarriage. They protest over our governements failure to legislate for the X Case.
This was a protest organised over a matter of hours. The response has been overwhelming.
Ireland needs a change. All these people are there to voice this chance.

We Are All Savita Halappanavar: Catholic Hospital in Ireland Denies Woman Life-Saving Abortion

lipstick-feminists:

youcanquotemethat:

Tonight, right now, over two thousand infuriated Irishmen and Women have gathered outside the Dáil in protest over the death of Savita Halappanavar, who died of septicaemia in Galway University Hospital after she had a miscarriage. They protest over our governements failure to legislate for the X Case.

This was a protest organised over a matter of hours. The response has been overwhelming.

Ireland needs a change. All these people are there to voice this chance.

We Are All Savita Halappanavar: Catholic Hospital in Ireland Denies Woman Life-Saving Abortion

(via curiousgeorgiana)