This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
Install Theme

adrians:

adrians:

the best thing about having the house to myself is that I can make breakfast in my underwear

image

(via proustianrecall)

twigwise:

unoetrino:

UNSTOPPABLE.

nyoom

twigwise:

unoetrino:

UNSTOPPABLE.

nyoom

(via eubalaena)

versobooks:

We’ve seen the future and it’s printed on these New Inquiry tote bags.

I want one!

versobooks:

We’ve seen the future and it’s printed on these New Inquiry tote bags.

I want one!

(via therumpus)

I did this radio show and the deejay asks me, ‘What if you woke up tomorrow and you were beautiful?’
What do you mean ‘what if’?
He said, ‘What if you woke up and you were blonde and you had blue eyes and you were 5’11 and you weighed 100 pounds and you were beautiful? What would you do?’
And I said, ‘Well, I probably wouldn’t get up ‘cause I’d be too weak to stand.’
And I felt very sorry for him, ‘cause if that’s the only kind if person that you think is beautiful, you must not see very much beauty in the world.
And I think everybody is beautiful. And if you don’t think that I am beautiful, you are missing out. Because I am so beautiful.

— Margaret Cho: Beautiful (via justanothersinger)

(via affably)

Horror stories about Muslim misogyny have long been used by western patriarchs to justify imperialism abroad and sexism at home. The Guardian’s Katharine Viner reminds us about Lord Cromer, the British consul general in Egypt from 1883. Cromer believed the Egyptians were morally and culturally inferior in their treatment of women and that they should be “persuaded or forced” to become “civilised” by disposing of the veil.

"And what did this forward-thinking, feminist-sounding veil-burner do when he got home to Britain?" asks Viner. "He founded and presided over the Men’s League for Opposing Women’s Suffrage, which tried, by any means possible, to stop women getting the vote. Colonial patriarchs like Cromer … wanted merely to replace eastern misogyny with western misogyny." More than a century later, the same logic is used to imply that misogyny only matters when it isn’t being done by white men.

iamjapanese:

Kirk Tatom(American)

Sunrise, Avon   2009

Coming Dawn 2

Bosque     oil on panel

Blue Storm   oil painting

Late Snow   oil   2012

Afternoon

Long Journey  

Starting Out  

Redbend

Look, you’re a feminist who, in this particular case, made the non-feminist choice. That’s all. I assume it was the right choice for you, or you wouldn’t have done it, and that’s fine! But feminism is not, in fact, all about choosing your choice. It is mostly about recognizing when things are fucked up for women at the societal level, and talking about that, and trying to change it. So sometimes, even when a decision is right for you, you still need to recognize that you made that decision within a social context that overwhelmingly supports your choice, and punishes women who make a different one.
jessica-messica:

someauthorgirl:

Guise, the 90s are back and I am not even mad. I had this exact outfit. I want it again. Now. 


I was just looking at this dress which I for sure had and for sure did not pay $80 for.

This is why you should never throw any of your clothes away.
Or at least, that’s what my mother would say.

jessica-messica:

someauthorgirl:

Guise, the 90s are back and I am not even mad. I had this exact outfit. I want it again. Now. 

I was just looking at this dress which I for sure had and for sure did not pay $80 for.

This is why you should never throw any of your clothes away.

Or at least, that’s what my mother would say.

(Source: modcloth.com)

fripperiesandfobs:

The Fraser Wedding Dress - used continuously by a single family since it was made in 1785, last worn in 2005
From Inverness Museums & Art Gallery via Emotional Objects

fripperiesandfobs:

The Fraser Wedding Dress - used continuously by a single family since it was made in 1785, last worn in 2005

From Inverness Museums & Art Gallery via Emotional Objects

(via lostinhistory)

18mr:

“When thinking of iconic romance, ask yourself if any imagery (paintings, photographs, film-stills) comes to mind that is not showing heterosexual couples? Probably not,” says photographer Braden Summers of his photo series of everyday gay and lesbian couples from around the globe.

[x]

(via theremina)

When you are 9, or 12, or 17, it is easy to overlook racist comments. That your friends’ dad does not like black people has little to do with what your friend thinks, right? When you cannot yet vote, the fact that your friends’ parents are Republicans means little. With age, these things start to matter. At 25 or 32, it is harder to overlook the inevitable racially ignorant comment that will come, especially when you have had access to friendships where this is never an issue. At 30 or 35, the fact that your white friends now vote Republican alongside their parents strikes you as a choice that detrimentally impacts your material existence.
Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board. For some they come in with the tide. For others they sail forever on the same horizon, never out of sight, never landing until the Watcher turns his eyes away in resignation, his dreams mocked to death by Time. That is the life of men. Now, women forget all those things they don’t want to remember, and remember everything they don’t want to forget. The dream is the truth. Then they act and do things accordingly.

— Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God