This is a personal blog. I talk sense and nonsense.
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A former LAPD officer turned sociologist (Cooper 1991) observed that the overwhelming majority of those beaten by police turn out not to be guilty of any crime. “Cops don’t beat up burglars”, he observed. The reason, he explained, is simple: the one thing most guaranteed to evoke a violent reaction from police is to challenge their right to “define the situation.” If what I’ve been saying is true this is just what we’d expect. The police truncheon is precisely the point where the state’s bureaucratic imperative for imposing simple administrative schema, and its monopoly of coercive force, come together. It only makes sense then that bureaucratic violence should consist first and foremost of attacks on those who insist on alternative schemas or interpretations. At the same time, if one accepts Piaget’s famous definition of mature intelligence as the ability to coordinate between multiple perspectives (or possible perspectives) one can see, here, precisely how bureaucratic power, at the moment it turns to violence, becomes literally a form of infantile stupidity.

— David Graeber, Dead Zones of the Imagination (via antoine-roquentin)

(via sociolab)

red-lipstick:

Nicolas Demeersman aka Pretty Punk (b. 1978, Seclin) Worldwide ongoing Fucking Tourist series 2009-2014 Captures The Resentment Of Locals With A Simple Gesture. (Info with each pic)

(via eubalaena)

Smashing Pumpkins

—Cherub Rock

sunbvther:

"Freak out, and give in. Doesn’t matter what you believe in."

(via rileykonor)

Status: Better

I’ve been on escitalopram for about two weeks and it actually seems to be working. Doc told me it has a faster onset of action than other meds, but I didn’t really believe her. Fuck me, but she was right.

I’m physically feeling a lot better. Like, certain bodily functions that have been fucked up for a long time are back to normal with a vengeance. I still have a ways to go, but at least it feels like I’m on my way. The fog is starting to lift.

Yesterday, I went on a lunch date with someone I met on OKC. He was nice. I told him way too much about myself and accidentally hit him with a steering wheel lock, but I think he liked me. We’ll see.

I love you all and hope you’re having a relaxing Labor Day.

(Source: nge2, via dion-thesocialist)

  • #HA
  • ourtimeorg:

It’s time to raise the minimum wage too http://wefb.it/RDFkx4

    ourtimeorg:

    It’s time to raise the minimum wage too http://wefb.it/RDFkx4

    The ideological roots of Stephen Harper’s vendetta against sociology →

    (Source: fycanadianpolitics, via jean-luc-gohard)

    mcmatteo:

824706:

I’m sorry I am but nothing will ever top this gif this is the greatest thing I’ve ever seen and I want to kiss this dog

He’s ready for an adventure

    mcmatteo:

    824706:

    I’m sorry I am but nothing will ever top this gif this is the greatest thing I’ve ever seen and I want to kiss this dog

    He’s ready for an adventure

    (Source: machistado, via jean-luc-gohard)

    archiemcphee:

    Colossal, the Department of Incredible Insects recently encountered more photos of the fascinating work of French artist Hubert Duprat and his industrious Caddisflies (previously featured here).

    "Right now, in almost every river in the world, some 12,000 different species of caddisfly larvae wriggle and crawl through sediment, twigs, and rocks in an attempt to build temporary aquatic cocoons. To do this, the small, slow-moving creatures excrete silk from salivary glands near their mouths which they use like mortar to stick together almost every available material into a cozy tube. A few weeks later a fully developed caddisfly emerges and almost immediately flies away."

    Since the 1980s Duprat has been collecting caddisfly larvae from their normal environments and transporting them to aquariums in his studio. There he gently removes their own natural cocoons and puts the larvae in tanks filled with materials such as pearls, beads, opals, turquoise and pieces of 18-karat gold. The insects still do exactly what comes naturally to them, but in doing so they create exquisite gilded sculptures that they temporarily call home. If you saw them out of context, you’d never guess they’d been created insects.

    Visit Colossal for additional images and video of Hubert Duprat discussing these amazing insects and their shiny, shiny creations.

    (Source: folkdad, via dion-thesocialist)

    therumpus:


On Monday, August 18th, at the 95th New York Comics Symposium, the cartoonist and instructor Tom Motley presented a talk and workshop entitled “Composition Lessons from the Masters.” The talk was held at the Butler Library at Columbia University. Karen Green introduced Motley, a veteran cartoonist and educator at both SVA and Pratt. He is a prolific illustrator, and his regular comic Tragic Strip appears in the Brooklyn Rail.
After a quick demonstration, Motley explained that composition is the “invisible component we don’t think of.” He covered the basics of renaissance composition, using the now famous photo of a fight that broke out in the Ukrainian parliament, and which, coincidentally, follows the rules of the golden ratio, an ideal of classical composition.

The New York Comics And Picture-Story Symposium: Tom Motley

    therumpus:

    On Monday, August 18th, at the 95th New York Comics Symposium, the cartoonist and instructor Tom Motley presented a talk and workshop entitled “Composition Lessons from the Masters.” The talk was held at the Butler Library at Columbia University. Karen Green introduced Motley, a veteran cartoonist and educator at both SVA and Pratt. He is a prolific illustrator, and his regular comic Tragic Strip appears in the Brooklyn Rail.

    After a quick demonstration, Motley explained that composition is the “invisible component we don’t think of.” He covered the basics of renaissance composition, using the now famous photo of a fight that broke out in the Ukrainian parliament, and which, coincidentally, follows the rules of the golden ratio, an ideal of classical composition.

    The New York Comics And Picture-Story Symposium: Tom Motley

    tumblino:

zettaslowzettago:

snarkpopotamus:

every time i see this, my heart fills with joy

Every time I see this, I worry that it’s a warning message from hungry crayons out to take over the world.

both are good

    tumblino:

    zettaslowzettago:

    snarkpopotamus:

    every time i see this, my heart fills with joy

    Every time I see this, I worry that it’s a warning message from hungry crayons out to take over the world.

    both are good

    (via workman)

    Unemployed Black Woman Pretends to be White, Job Offers Suddenly Skyrocket →

    If you don’t believe that racism in the job market is real, then please read this article by Yolanda Spivey.  Spivey, who was seeking work in the insurance industry, found that she wasn’t getting any job offers.  But as an experiment, she changed her name to Bianca White, to see if employers would respond differently.  You’ll be shocked and amazed by her phenomenal story. 

    Before I begin, let me quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington who said, “Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color.”

    For two years, I have been unemployed.   In the beginning, I applied to more than three hundred open positions in the insurance industry—an industry that I’ve worked in for the previous ten years.  Not one employer responded to my resume.  So, I enrolled back into college to finish my degree. After completing school this past May, I resumed my search for employment and was quite shocked that I wasn’t getting a single response.   I usually applied for positions advertised on the popular website Monster.com. I’d used it in the past and have been successful in obtaining jobs through it.

    Two years ago, I noticed that Monster.com had added a “diversity questionnaire” to the site.  This gives an applicant the opportunity to identify their sex and race to potential employers.  Monster.com guarantees that this “option” will not jeopardize your chances of gaining employment.  You must answer this questionnaire in order to apply to a posted position—it cannot be skipped.  At times, I would mark off that I was a Black female, but then I thought, this might be hurting my chances of getting employed, so I started selecting the “decline to identify” option instead.  That still had no effect on my getting a job.  So I decided to try an experiment:  I created a fake job applicant and called her Bianca White.

    First, I created an email account and resume for Bianca.  I kept the same employment history and educational background on her resume that was listed on my own. But I removed my home phone number, kept my listed cell phone number, and changed my cell phone greeting to say, “You have reached Bianca White.  Please leave a message.” Then I created an online Monster.com account, listed Bianca as a White woman on the diversity questionnaire, and activated the account.

    That very same day, I received a phone call.  The next day, my phone line and Bianca’s email address, were packed with potential employers calling for an interview.  I was stunned.  More shocking was that some employers, mostly Caucasian-sounding women, were calling Bianca more than once, desperate to get an interview with her.  All along, my real Monster.com account was open and active; but, despite having the same background as Bianca, I received no phone calls.    Two jobs actually did email me and Bianca at the same time.  But they were commission only sales positions.  Potential positions offering a competitive salary and benefits all went to Bianca.

    At the end of my little experiment, (which lasted a week), Bianca White had received nine phone calls—I received none.  Bianca had received a total of seven emails, while I’d only received two, which again happen to have been the same emails Bianca received. Let me also point out that one of the emails that contacted Bianca for a job wanted her to relocate to a different state, all expenses paid, should she be willing to make that commitment.  In the end, a total of twenty-four employers looked at Bianca’s resume while only ten looked at mines.

    Is this a conspiracy, or what? I’m almost convinced that White Americans aren’t suffering from disparaging unemployment rates as their Black counterpart because all the jobs are being saved for other White people.

    My little experiment certainly proved a few things.  First, I learned that answering the diversity questionnaire on job sites such as Monster.com’s may work against minorities, as employers are judging whom they hire based on it.  Second, I learned to suspect that resumes with ethnic names may go into the wastebasket and never see the light of day.

    Other than being chronically out of work, I embarked on this little experiment because of a young woman I met while I was in school.  She was a twenty-two-year-old Caucasian woman who, like myself, was about to graduate.  She was so excited about a job she had just gotten with a well-known sporting franchise.  She had no prior work experience and had applied for a clerical position, but was offered a higher post as an executive manager making close to six figures.  I was curious to know how she’d been able to land such a position.  She was candid in telling me that the human resource person who’d hired her just “liked” her and told her that she deserved to be in a higher position.  The HR person was also Caucasian.

    Another reason that pushed me to do this experiment is because of the media. There’s not a day that goes by in which I fail to see a news program about how tough the job market is.  Recently, while I was watching a report on underemployed and underpaid Americans, I saw a middle aged White man complaining that he was making only $80,000 which was $30,000 less than what he was making before.  I thought to myself that in this economy, many would feel they’d hit the jackpot if they made 80K a year.

    In conclusion, I would like to once again quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington when he said, “You can’t hold a man down without staying down with him.”

    The more America continues to hold back great candidates based on race, the more our economy is going to stay in a rut.  We all need each other to prosper, flourish, and to move ahead.

    (Source: onlyblackgirl, via jean-luc-gohard)